A Parisienne in Chicago: Impressions of the World's Columbian Exposition

A Parisienne in Chicago: Impressions of the World's Columbian Exposition

By: Madame Leon Grandin (author), Arnold Lewis (author), Mary Beth Raycraft (author)Hardback

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About Author

Madame Leon Grandin was a Parisian writer and the wife of a prominent sculptor commissioned to work on the World's Columbian Exhibition fountain. Mary Beth Raycraft is a senior lecturer in French in the Department of French and Italian at Vanderbilt University.

Product Details

  • publication date: 01/04/2010
  • ISBN13: 9780252035135
  • Format: Hardback
  • Number Of Pages: 264
  • ID: 9780252035135
  • weight: 522
  • ISBN10: 0252035135

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