Advanced Nanomaterials

Advanced Nanomaterials

By: Hiroyuki Nishide (editor), Kurt E. Geckeler (editor)Hardback

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Description

In this first comprehensive compilation of review chapters on this hot topic, more than 30 experts from around the world provide in-depth chapters on their specific areas of expertise, covering such essential topics as: � Block Copolymer Systems, Nanofibers and Nanotubes � Helical Polymer-Based Supramolecular Films � Synthesis of Inorganic Nanotubes � Gold Nanoparticles and Carbon Nanotubes � Recent Advances in Metal Nanoparticle-Attached Electrodes � Oxidation Catalysis by Nanoscale Gold, Silver, and Copper � Concepts in Self-Assembly � Nanocomposites � Amphiphilic Poly(Oxyalkylene)-Amines � Mesoporous Alumina � Nanoceramics for Medical Applications � Ecological Toxicology of Engineered Carbon Nanoparticles � Molecular Imprinting � Near-Field Raman Imaging of Nanostructures and Devices � Fullerene-Rich Nanostructures � Interactions of Carbon Nanotubes with Biomolecules � Nanoparticle-Cored Dendrimers and Hyperbranched Polymers � Nanostructured Organogels via Molecular Self-Assembly � Structural DNA Nanotechnology With its coverage of all such important areas as self-assembly, polymeric materials, bionanomaterials, nanotubes, photonic and environmental aspects, this is an essential reference for materials scientists, engineers, chemists, physicists and biologists wishing to gain an in-depth knowledge of all the disciplines involved.

About Author

Kurt Geckeler is Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST) in South Korea. He is also Chair and WCU Professor of the Department of Nanobio Materials and Electronics, World Class University (WCU), and affiliated with the Institute of Medical System Engineering. Having obtained his academic degrees in Germany, he has been Visiting Professor in the USA (Harvard University and several others), in France, and in Chile. He is also Editor-in-Chief of the journal "Polymer International", published by John Wiley & Sons, and serving on the Editorial boards of a series of other international journals. In addition, he initiated and co-chaired the biannual international IUPAC symposium series on "Macro- and Supramolecular Architectures and Materials (MAM)". He has published more than 300 journal articles, over 60 patents, a dozen book chapters, and 6 books. Hiroyuki Nishide is Professor at Department of Applied Chemistry, Waseda University, Tokyo. He received his PhD in 1975, Japan, and has been visiting researcher at Free University Berlin and Polytechnic University New York. he has published more than 500 journal articles. He is the Editorial Board member of Polymer Journal and Green Chemistry Letters and Reviews, and is Past-President of the Society of Polymer Science, Japan, Vice-President of Japan Union of Chemical Science and Technology, and President of the Federation of Asian Polymer Societies.

Contents

Preface XV List of Contributors XVII Volume 1 1 Phase-Selective Chemistry in Block Copolymer Systems 1 Evan L. Schwartz and Christopher K. Ober 1.1 Block Copolymers as Useful Nanomaterials 1 1.1.1 Introduction 1 1.1.2 Self-Assembly of Block Copolymers 3 1.1.3 Triblock Copolymers 4 1.1.4 Rod Coil Block Copolymers 7 1.1.5 Micelle Formation 8 1.1.6 Synthesis of Block Copolymers Using Living Polymerization Techniques 9 1.1.7 Post-Polymerization Modifi cations 14 1.2 Block Copolymers as Lithographic Materials 15 1.2.1 Introduction to Lithography 15 1.2.2 Block Copolymers as Nanolithographic Templates 17 1.2.3 Multilevel Resist Strategies Using Block Copolymers 29 1.3 Nanoporous Monoliths Using Block Copolymers 34 1.3.1 Structure Direction Using Block Copolymer Scaffolds 34 1.3.2 Nanopore Size Tunability 36 1.3.3 Functionalized Nanoporous Surfaces 38 1.4 Photo-Crosslinkable Nano-Objects 41 1.5 Block Copolymers as Nanoreactors 44 1.5.1 Polymer Metal Solubility 44 1.5.2 Cluster Nucleation and Growth 46 1.5.3 Block Copolymer Micelle Nanolithography 47 1.6 Interface-Active Block Copolymers 48 1.6.1 Low-Energy Surfaces Using Fluorinated Block Copolymers 48 1.6.2 Patterning Surface Energies 49 1.6.3 Photoswitchable Surface Energies Using Block Copolymers Containing Azobenzene 51 1.6.4 Light-Active Azobenzene Block Copolymer Vesicles as Drug Delivery Devices 52 1.6.5 Azobenzene-Containing Block Copolymers as Holographic Materials 52 1.7 Summary and Outlook 54 References 60 2 Block Copolymer Nanofibers and Nanotubes 67 Guojun Liu 2.1 Introduction 67 2.2 Preparation 69 2.2.1 Nanofi ber Preparation 69 2.2.2 Nanotube Preparation 72 2.3 Solution Properties 74 2.4 Chemical Reactions 81 2.4.1 Backbone Modifi cation 81 2.4.2 End Functionalization 85 2.5 Concluding Remarks 87 Acknowledgements 88 References 88 3 Smart Nanoassemblies of Block Copolymers for Drug and Gene Delivery 91 Horacio Cabral and Kazunori Kataoka 3.1 Introduction 91 3.2 Smart Nanoassemblies for Drug and Gene Delivery 92 3.3 Endogenous Triggers 93 3.3.1 pH-Sensitive Nanoassemblies 93 3.3.2 Oxidation- and Reduction-Sensitive Polymeric Nanoassemblies 99 3.3.3 Other Endogenous Triggers 101 3.4 External Stimuli 102 3.4.1 Temperature 102 3.4.2 Light 105 3.4.3 Ultrasound 107 3.5 Future Perspectives 108 References 109 4 A Comprehensive Approach to the Alignment and Ordering of Block Copolymer Morphologies 111 Massimo Lazzari and Claudio De Rosa 4.1 Introduction 111 4.1.1 Motivation 111 4.1.2 Organization of the Chapter 112 4.2 How to Help Phase Separation 113 4.3 Orientation by External Fields 116 4.3.1 Mechanical Flow Fields 117 4.3.2 Electric and Magnetic Fields 118 4.3.3 Solvent Evaporation and Thermal Gradient 122 4.4 Templated Self-Assembly on Nanopatterned Surfaces 123 4.5 Epitaxy and Surface Interactions 126 4.5.1 Preferential Wetting and Homogeneous Surface Interactions 126 4.5.2 Epitaxy 128 4.5.3 Directional Crystallization 130 4.5.4 Graphoepitaxy and Other Confi ning Geometries 135 4.5.5 Combination of Directional Crystallization and Graphoepitaxy 138 4.5.6 Combination of Epitaxy and Directional Crystallization 140 4.6 Summary and Outlook 149 Acknowledgments 150 References 150 5 Helical Polymer-Based Supramolecular Films 159 Akihiro Ohira, Michiya Fujiki, and Masashi Kunitake 5.1 Introduction 159 5.2 Helical Polymer-Based 1-D and 2-D Architectures 161 5.2.1 Formation of Various 1-D Architectures of Helical Polysilanes on Surfaces 162 5.2.2 Formation of Mesoscopic 2-D Hierarchical Superhelical Assemblies 167 5.2.3 Formation of 2-D Crystallization of Poly( -L-Glutamates) on Surfaces 172 5.2.4 Summary of Helical Polymer-Based 1-D and 2-D Architectures 176 5.3 Helical Polymer-Based Functional Films 177 5.3.1 Chiroptical Memory and Switch in Helical Polysilane Films 178 5.3.2 Chiroptical Transfer and Amplifi cation in Binary Helical Polysilane Films 185 5.3.3 Summary of Helical Polymer-Based Functional Films 188 Acknowledgments 189 References 190 6 Synthesis of Inorganic Nanotubes 195 C.N.R. Rao and Achutharao Govindaraj 6.1 Introduction 195 6.2 General Synthetic Strategies 196 6.3 Nanotubes of Metals and other Elemental Materials 196 6.4 Metal Chalcogenide Nanotubes 206 6.5 Metal Oxide Nanotubes 214 6.5.1 SiO2 Nanotubes 214 6.5.2 TiO2 Nanotubes 216 6.5.3 ZnO, CdO, and Al2O3 Nanotubes 221 6.5.4 Nanotubes of Vanadium and Niobium Oxides 225 6.5.5 Nanotubes of other Transition Metal Oxides 228 6.5.6 Nanotubes of other Binary Oxides 230 6.5.7 Nanotubes of Titanates and other Complex Oxides 233 6.6 Pnictide Nanotubes 235 6.7 Nanotubes of Carbides and other Materials 240 6.8 Complex Inorganic Nanostructures Based on Nanotubes 240 6.9 Outlook 241 Referecnes 241 7 Gold Nanoparticles and Carbon Nanotubes: Precursors for Novel Composite Materials 249 Thathan Premkumar and Kurt E. Geckeler 7.1 Introduction 249 7.2 Gold Nanoparticles 249 7.3 Carbon Nanotubes 251 7.4 CNT Metal Nanoparticle Composites 254 7.5 CNT AuNP Composites 255 7.5.1 Filling of CNTs with AuNPs 255 7.5.2 Deposition of AuNPs Directly on the CNT Surface 256 7.5.3 Interaction Between Modifi ed AuNPs and CNTs 267 7.6 Applications 288 7.7 Merits and Demerits of Synthetic Approaches 289 7.8 Conclusions 291 Acknowledgments 292 References 292 8 Recent Advances in Metal Nanoparticle-Attached Electrodes 297 Munetaka Oyama, Akrajas Ali Umar, and Jingdong Zhang 8.1 Introduction 297 8.2 Seed-Mediated Growth Method for the Attachment and Growth of AuNPs on ITO 298 8.3 Electrochemical Applications of AuNP-Attached ITO 300 8.4 Improved Methods for Attachment and Growth of AuNPs on ITO 302 8.5 Attachment and Growth of AuNPs on Other Substrates 306 8.6 Attachment and Growth of Au Nanoplates on ITO 308 8.7 Attachment and Growth of Silver Nanoparticles (AgNPs) on ITO 309 8.8 Attachment and Growth of Palladium Nanoparticles PdNPs on ITO 311 8.9 Attachment of Platinum Nanoparticles PtNPs on ITO and GC 312 8.10 Electrochemical Measurements of Biomolecules Using AuNP/ ITO Electrodes 315 8.11 Nonlinear Optical Properties of Metal NP-Attached ITO 315 8.12 Concluding Remarks 316 References 316 9 Mesoscale Radical Polymers: Bottom-Up Fabrication of Electrodes in Organic Polymer Batteries 319 Kenichi Oyaizu and Hiroyuki Nishide 9.1 Mesostructured Materials for Energy Storage Devices 319 9.2 Mesoscale Fabrication of Inorganic Electrode-Active Materials 322 9.3 Bottom-Up Strategy for Organic Electrode Fabrication 323 9.3.1 Conjugated Polymers for Electrode-Active Materials 323 9.3.2 Mesoscale Organic Radical Polymer Electrodes 324 9.4 Conclusions 330 References 330 10 Oxidation Catalysis by Nanoscale Gold, Silver, and Copper 333 Zhi Li, Soorly G. Divakara, and Ryan M. Richards 10.1 Introduction 333 10.2 Preparations 334 10.2.1 Silver Nanocatalysts 335 10.2.2 Copper Nanocatalysts 335 10.2.3 Gold Nanocatalysts 335 10.3 Selective Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide (CO) 337 10.3.1 Gold Catalysts 337 10.3.2 Silver Catalysts 342 10.3.3 Gold Silver Alloy Catalysts 342 10.3.4 Copper Catalysts 343 10.4 Epoxidation Reactions 344 10.4.1 Gold Catalysts 344 10.4.2 Silver Catalysts 346 10.5 Selective Oxidation of Hydrocarbons 347 10.5.1 Gold Catalysts 349 10.5.2 Silver Catalysts 350 10.5.3 Copper Catalysts 350 10.6 Oxidation of Alcohols and Aldehydes 350 10.6.1 Gold Catalysts 351 10.6.2 Silver Catalysts 351 10.7 Direct Synthesis of Hydrogen Peroxide 353 10.8 Conclusions 354 References 355 11 Self-Assembling Nanoclusters Based on Tetrahalometallate Anions: Electronic and Mechanical Behavior 365 Ishenkumba A. Kahwa 11.1 Introduction 365 11.2 Preparation of Key Compounds 366 11.3 Structure of the [(A(18C6))4(MX4)] [BX4]2 * nH2O Complexes 367 11.4 Structure of the [(Na(15C5))4Br] [TlBr4]3 Complex 368 11.5 Spectroscopy of the Cubic F23 [(A(18C6))4(MX4)] [BX4]2 * nH2O 368 11.6 Unusual Luminescence Spectroscopy of Some Cubic [(A(18C6))4(MnX4)] [TlCl4]2 * nH2O Compounds 372 11.7 Luminescence Decay Dynamics and 18C6 Rotations 374 11.8 Conclusions 375 Acknowledgments 377 References 377 12 Optically Responsive Polymer Nanocomposites Containing Organic Functional Chromophores and Metal Nanostructures 379 Andrea Pucci, Giacomo Ruggeri, and Francesco Ciardelli 12.1 Introduction 379 12.2 Organic Chromophores as the Dispersed Phase 380 12.2.1 Nature of the Organic Dye 380 12.2.2 Polymeric Indicators to Mechanical Stress 381 12.3 Metal Nanostructures as the Dispersed Phase 389 12.3.1 Optical Properties of Metal Nanoassemblies 389 12.3.2 Nanocomposite-Based Indicators to Mechanical Stress 391 12.4 Conclusions 397 Acknowledgments 398 References 398 13 Nanocomposites Based on Phyllosilicates: From Petrochemicals to Renewable Thermoplastic Matrices 403 Maria-Beatrice Coltelli, Serena Coiai, Simona Bronco, and Elisa Passaglia 13.1 Introduction 403 13.1.1 Structure of Phyllosilicates 404 13.1.2 Morphology of Composites 408 13.1.3 Properties of Composites 411 13.2 Polyolefi n-Based Nanocomposites 411 13.2.1 Overview of the Preparation Methods 412 13.2.2 Organophilic Clay and Compatibilizer: Interactions with the Polyolefi n Matrix 414 13.2.3 The One-Step Process 426 13.3 Poly(Ethylene Terephthalate)-Based Nanocomposites 429 13.3.1 In Situ Polymerization 430 13.3.2 Intercalation in Solution 433 13.3.3 Intercalation in the Melt 434 13.4 Poly(Lactide) (PLA)-Based Nanocomposites 439 13.4.1 Overview of Preparation Methods 439 13.5 Conclusions 447 Acknowledgments 449 References 450 Volume 2 14 Amphiphilic Poly(Oxyalkylene)-Amines Interacting with Layered Clays: Intercalation, Exfoliation, and New Applications 459 Jiang-Jen Lin, Ying-Nan Chan, and Wen-Hsin Chang 15 Mesoporous Alumina: Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalysis 481 Tsunetake Seki and Makoto Onaka 16 Nanoceramics for Medical Applications 523 Besim Ben-Nissan and Andy H. Choi 17 Self-healing of Surface Cracks in Structural Ceramics 555 Wataru Nakao, Koji Takahashi, and Kotoji Ando 18 Ecological Toxicology of Engineered Carbon Nanoparticles 595 Aaron P. Roberts and Ryan R. Otter 19 Carbon Nanotubes as Adsorbents for the Removal of Surface Water Contaminants 615 Jose E. Herrera and Jing Cheng 20 Molecular Imprinting with Nanomaterials 651 Kevin Flavin and Marina Resmini 21 Near-Field Raman Imaging of Nanostructures and Devices 677 Ze Xiang Shen, Johnson Kasim, and Ting Yu 22 Fullerene-Rich Nanostructures 699 Fernando Langa and Jean-Francois Nierengarten 23 Interactions of Carbon Nanotubes with Biomolecules: Advances and Challenges 715 Dhriti Nepal and Kurt E. Geckeler 24 Nanoparticle-Cored Dendrimers and Hyperbranched Polymers: Synthesis, Properties, and Applications 743 Young-Seok Shon 25 Concepts in Self-Assembly 767 Jeremy J. Ramsden 26 Nanostructured Organogels via Molecular Self-Assembly 791 Arjun S. Krishnan, Kristen E. Roskov, and Richard J. Spontak 27 Self-assembly of Linear Polypeptide-based Block Copolymers 835 Sebastien Lecommandoux, Harm-Anton Klok, and Helmut Schlaad 28 Structural DNA Nanotechnology: Information-Guided Self-Assembly 869 Yonggang Ke, Yan Liu, and Hao Yan Index 881

Product Details

  • ISBN13: 9783527317943
  • Format: Hardback
  • Number Of Pages: 954
  • ID: 9783527317943
  • weight: 2048
  • ISBN10: 3527317945

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