America's Poor and the Great Recession

America's Poor and the Great Recession

By: Kristin S. Seefeldt (author), John D. Graham (author), Tavis Smiley (foreword_author)Paperback

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Millions have entered poverty as a result of the Great Recession's terrible toll of long-term unemployment. Kristin S. Seefeldt and John D. Graham examine recent trends in poverty and assess the performance of America's "safety net" programs. They consider likely scenarios for future developments and conclude that the well-being of low-income Americans, particularly the working poor, the near poor, and the new poor, is at substantial risk despite economic recovery.

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About Author

Kristin S. Seefeldt is Assistant Professor of Social Work at the University of Michigan and author of Working after Welfare: How Women Balance Jobs and Family in the Wake of Welfare Reform and Welfare Reform. John D. Graham is Dean of the Indiana University School of Public and Environmental Affairs and author of Bush on the Home Front: Domestic Policy Triumphs and Setbacks (IUP, 2010). From 2001 to 2006 he served as Administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, White House Office of Management and Budget.


Foreword by Tavis Smiley Introduction 1. The Great Recession: Definition, Duration, and Impact 2. The Impact of the Great Recession on Poverty in America 3. The Performance of America's Safety Net 4. Risks to the Safety Net in the Aftermath of the Great Recession 5. Policy Options in a Politically Polarized Environment

Product Details

  • publication date: 25/11/2012
  • ISBN13: 9780253009746
  • Format: Paperback
  • Number Of Pages: 178
  • ID: 9780253009746
  • weight: 273
  • ISBN10: 025300974X

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