Annual Plant Reviews: Insect-plant Interactions (Annual Plant Reviews 47)

Annual Plant Reviews: Insect-plant Interactions (Annual Plant Reviews 47)

By: Claudia Voelckel (editor), George Jander (editor)Hardback

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Description

This latest volume in Wiley Blackwell s prestigious Annual Plant Reviews brings together articles that describe the biochemical, genetic, and ecological aspects of plant interactions with insect herbivores. The biochemistry section of this outstanding volume includes reviews highlighting significant findings in the area of plant signalling cascades, recognition of herbivore-associated molecular patterns, sequestration of plant defensive metabolites and perception of plant semiochemicals by insects. Chapters in the genetics section are focused on genetic mapping of herbivore resistance traits and the analysis of transcriptional responses in both plants and insects. The ecology section includes chapters that describe plant-insect interactions at a higher level, including multitrophic interactions, investigations of the cost-benefit paradigm and the altitudinal niche-breadth hypothesis, and a re-evaluation of co-evolution in the light of recent molecular research. Written by many of the world s leading researchers in these subjects, and edited by Claudia Voelckel and Georg Jander, this volume is designed for students and researchers with some background in plant molecular biology or ecology, who would like to learn more about recent advances or obtain a more in-depth understanding of this field. This volume will also be of great use and interest to a wide range of plant scientists and entomologists and is an essential purchase for universities and research establishments where biological sciences are studied and taught. To view details of volumes in Annual Plant Reviews, visit: www.wiley.com/go/apr Also available from Wiley: Plant Defense Dale Walters 9781405175890 Herbicides and Plant Physiology, 2nd Edn Andrew Cobb & John Reade 9781405129350

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About Author

Claudia Voelckel is a genetics lecturer at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand. She is investigating plant-insect interactions, ecological divergence and the adaptive potential of species in the New Zealand flora. Comparative transcriptomics and genome analyses are an important aspect of this work. Georg Jander is an associate professor at the Boyce Thompson Institute, an independent plant research institute on the campus of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. Professor Jander s research is focused on using genetic and biochemical approaches to identify molecular mechanisms of plant resistance to insect herbivores.

Contents

List of Contributors xv Preface xxi Section 1 Biochemistry of Insect-Plant Interactions 1 Plants Recognize Herbivorous Insects by Complex Signalling Networks 1 Gustavo Bonaventure 1.1 Introduction 1 1.1.1 The feeding behaviour of insects is an important determinant of the plant s defence response 1 1.1.2 Insect-associated elicitors are specific elicitors of plant responses to insect feeding or egg deposition 2 1.2 Resistance (R) genes in the perception of piercing-sucking insects 6 1.3 Modification of elicitors by plant enzymes 8 1.4 Changes in Vm, Ca2+influx and reactive oxygen intermediate generation are early cellular events induced in plants by insect feeding 9 1.5 Shared signal transduction components in microbe and insect elicitor perception 12 1.6 Regulation of phytohormone accumulation and signaling during insect feeding 14 1.6.1 Jasmonic acid 17 1.6.2 Ethylene 20 1.6.3 Salicylic acid 21 1.7 Interconnection of the phytohormone system in plants 22 1.8 Conclusions and perspectives 23 Acknowledgements 24 References 24 2 Herbivore Oral Secretions are the First Line of Protection Against Plant-Induced Defences 37 Gary W. Felton, Seung Ho Chung, Maria Gloria Estrada Hernandez, Joe Louis, Michelle Peiffer and Donglan Tian 2.1 Introduction 38 2.2 Origin of herbivore secretions and initiation of contact with the host plant 40 2.2.1 Piercing-sucking herbivores 41 2.2.2 Chewing herbivores 42 2.3 How do herbivores deliver effectors to the host plant? 45 2.4 Examples of HAMPs and effectors 46 2.4.1 Piercing-sucking herbivores 46 2.4.2 Chewing herbivores 49 2.5 Effectors and host targets 54 2.6 Effectors and the host plant diet 56 2.7 Metagenomes: The interkingdom crossroads of the host plant, herbivore, and microbiome 56 Acknowledgements 62 References 62 3 Insect Detoxification and Sequestration Strategies 77 David G. Heckel 3.1 Introduction 77 3.2 Diverse roles of insect cytochromes P450 78 3.2.1 Furanocoumarin detoxification by Papilio spp. and others 79 3.2.2 Monoterpene detoxification and pheromone biosynthesis in pine bark beetles 84 3.2.3 Gossypol and CYP6AE14 in Helicoverpa armigera 85 3.2.4 Cactophilic Drosophila and alkaloid detoxification 85 3.3 Cyanogenic glucosides 86 3.4 Glucosinolates 89 3.5 Oglucosides and leaf beetles 93 3.6 Pyrrolizidine alkaloids 97 3.7 Glycosylation of host plant compounds 99 3.8 Non-protein amino acids 101 3.9 Iridoid glucosides 102 3.10 Cardenolides 103 3.11 Conclusions 106 Acknowledgements 107 References 107 4 Plant Semiochemicals Perception and Behavioural Responses by Insects 115 Andreas Reinecke and Monika Hilker 4.1 Introduction 115 4.2 A semiochemical s route to the neuron 118 4.2.1 Surfing the surface A matter of chemo-physical interaction 120 4.2.2 Odorant binding proteins, chemosensory proteins 122 4.2.3 Eliciting signals Odorant receptors and sensory neuron responses to odorants 123 4.2.4 The clean-up company Odorant-degrading enzymes 128 4.2.5 Odour perception Summary 128 4.3 Behavioural responses of insects to plant volatiles 129 4.3.1 Biotic habitat factors influencing plant odour dispersal and insect orientation 130 4.3.2 Biotic factors affecting plant odour emission 131 4.3.3 Wise responses to plant odours? The impact of odour experience on insect behaviour 132 4.3.4 Sick insects and their responses to plant odour 134 4.3.5 Age-dependency of insect responses to plant odour 134 4.3.6 Adjusting the responses to plant odour according to the needs 135 4.4 Conclusions 136 References 137 Section 2 Genetics and Genomics of Insect-Plant Interactions 5 Plant Transcriptomic Responses to Herbivory 155 Hanna M. Heidel-Fischer, Richard O. Musser and Heiko Vogel 5.1 Introduction 155 5.2 Mechanical wounding, feeding mode and HAMPs 157 5.3 Wounding rates and salivary gland applications 158 5.4 Responses to insects from different feeding guilds 165 5.4.1 Chewing herbivores 167 5.4.2 Piercing-sucking herbivores 168 5.4.3 The pitfalls of the generalist-specialist paradigm 171 5.5 A meta-analysis of microarray studies on transcriptomic responses to herbivory 172 5.6 Simultaneous attack or multiple feeding 176 5.7 Transcriptomics responses to herbivory An outlook 179 5.7.1 Open questions 179 5.7.2 New tools and approaches 181 Acknowledgements 182 References 182 6 Transcriptome Responses in Herbivorous Insects Towards Host Plant and Toxin Feeding 197 Heiko Vogel, Richard O. Musser and Maria de la Paz Celorio-Mancera 6.1 Introduction 198 6.2 Challenges for insect herbivores and inducible responses 200 6.2.1 Phytohormones 202 6.2.2 Plant defensive chemicals Toxins and deterrents 205 6.2.3 Proteinaceous effectors 210 6.2.4 Plant nutrients 212 6.2.5 Whole plant, tissue and organ feeding 214 6.2.6 Common expression signatures and specific differences 215 6.3 Genomic responses to plant and toxin feeding An outlook 218 6.3.1 Open questions 218 6.3.2 New tools and approaches 221 Acknowledgements 223 References 223 7 Quantitative Genetics and Genomics of Plant Resistance to Insects 235 Daniel J. Kliebenstein 7.1 Introduction 235 7.2 Metabolites 238 7.2.1 Glucosinolates 238 7.2.2 Maysin 245 7.2.3 Tomato trichome chemistry 245 7.2.4 Saponins 246 7.3 Physical defences 246 7.4 Signal transduction variation 248 7.5 Physiology 249 7.6 Why have genetic variation in defence? 249 7.7 Summary 250 References 252 Section 3 Ecology and Evolution of Insect-Plant Interactions 8 Costs of Resistance in Plants: From Theory to Evidence 263 Don Cipollini, Dale Walters and Claudia Voelckel 8.1 The cost-benefit paradigm 263 8.1.1 Hypotheses of plant defence 265 8.1.2 Why do plants have induced defences? 272 8.2 Measuring fitness costs and benefits of plant defence traits 276 8.2.1 Generating trait variation 276 8.2.2 The empirical evidence for costs of resistance 284 8.3 Ecologically relevant settings 289 8.3.1 Competition 290 8.3.2 Nutrient availability 293 8.3.3 Multiple enemies 294 8.3.4 Enemies vs. mutualists 295 8.4 Conclusions 297 References 297 9 Plant-mediated Interactions Among Insects within a Community Ecological Perspective 309 Erik H. Poelman and Marcel Dicke 9.1 Introduction to plant-mediated species interactions 309 9.1.1 Plant-based insect community structure 309 9.1.2 Plant-mediated species interactions 311 9.2 Plant-mediated species interactions among herbivores 313 9.2.1 Specificity of plant responses to herbivores 313 9.2.2 Asymmetric plant-mediated effects on herbivore performance 314 9.2.3 Plant-mediated effects on herbivore oviposition 315 9.3 Three trophic level interactions 316 9.3.1 Attraction of natural enemies 316 9.3.2 Herbivore diversity affects plant-mediated interactions with natural enemies 318 9.4 Aboveground-belowground interactions 319 9.5 Herbivore-pollinator interactions 320 9.6 Plant-mediated species interactions in a community 322 9.6.1 Plant-mediated interactions involving multiple herbivores 322 9.6.2 Carnivores affecting plant-mediated interactions in communities 325 9.6.3 Plant-mediated interactions beyond individual plants 326 9.7 Synthesis in the context of plant fitness and future directions 327 References 329 10 The Altitudinal Niche-Breadth Hypothesis in Insect-Plant Interactions 339 Sergio Rasmann, Nadir Alvarez and Lo c Pellissier 10.1 Introduction Variation of niche-breadth along ecological gradients 340 10.2 Herbivorous insects, from specialists to generalists 343 10.3 Evidence for an altitudinal gradient in niche-breadth and climatic variability 344 10.3.1 Does environmental variability increase with increasing altitude? 345 10.3.2 Does variability in host-plant population size increase with increasing altitude? 346 10.4 The altitudinal niche-breadth paradigm 348 10.4.1 Pollinators 348 10.4.2 Herbivores, plant quality and plant defences 349 10.4.3 Predator effects on herbivores 350 10.5 Outlook Other factors influencing altitudinal niche breadth evolution studies 351 10.5.1 Phylogenetic constraints and correlated life-history traits 351 10.5.2 Phylogeography 352 10.5.3 Phytophagous insect abundance 352 10.5.4 Range size 353 10.5.5 Non-linear relationship along the altitudinal clines 353 10.6 Conclusion 354 Acknowledgements 354 References 354 11 Revisiting Plant-Herbivore Co-Evolution in the Molecular Biology Era 361 Georg Jander 11.1 Introduction 361 11.2 Glucosinolates in the Brassicaceae 363 11.3 Benzoxazinoids in the Poaceae 365 11.4 Evolution from primary metabolism 367 11.5 Convergent evolution of defence pathways 368 11.6 Rapid adaptation through modular biosynthetic pathways 370 11.7 Specialist herbivores have evolved to detoxify secondary metabolites 371 11.8 Costs of plant resistance 372 11.9 Molecular phylogenetic evidence for co-evolution 374 11.10 The benefits of metabolic pathway co-regulation 374 11.11 Modification of secondary metabolites as a form of defensive priming 375 11.12 Use of secondary metabolites as defensive signals 377 11.13 Conclusion and future prospects 378 References 379 Index 385

Product Details

  • publication date: 07/05/2014
  • ISBN13: 9780470670361
  • Format: Hardback
  • Number Of Pages: 420
  • ID: 9780470670361
  • weight: 888
  • ISBN10: 0470670363

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