Ceramics Science and Technology, Volume 3: Synthesis and Processing (Ceramics Science and Technology (VCH))

Ceramics Science and Technology, Volume 3: Synthesis and Processing (Ceramics Science and Technology (VCH))

By: Ralf Riedel (editor), I-Wei Chen (editor)Hardback

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Description

Although ceramics have been known to mankind literally for millennia, research has never ceased. Apart from the classic uses as a bulk material in pottery, construction, and decoration, the latter half of the twentieth century saw an explosive growth of application fields, such as electrical and thermal insulators, wear-resistant bearings, surface coatings, lightweight armour, or aerospace materials. In addition to plain, hard solids, modern ceramics come in many new guises such as fabrics, ultrathin films, microstructures and hybrid composites. Built on the solid foundations laid down by the 20-volume series Materials Science and Technology, Ceramics Science and Technology picks out this exciting material class and illuminates it from all sides. Materials scientists, engineers, chemists, biochemists, physicists and medical researchers alike will find this work a treasure trove for a wide range of ceramics knowledge from theory and fundamentals to practical approaches and problem solutions.

About Author

Prof. Riedel has been Professor at the Institute of Materials Science at the Darmstadt University of Technology in Darmstadt since 1993. He received a Diploma degree in chemistry in 1984 and he finished his dissertation in Inorganic Chemistry in 1986 at the University of Stuttgart. After postdoctoral research at the Max-Planck-Institute for Metals Research and the Institute of Inorganic Chemistry at the University of Stuttgart he completed his habilitation in the field of Inorganic Chemistry in 1992. Prof. Riedel is Fellow of the American Ceramic Society and was awarded with the Dionyz Stur Gold Medal for merits in natural sciences. He is a member of the World Academy of Ceramics and Guest Professor at the Jiangsu University in Zhenjiang, China. In 2006 he received an honorary doctorate from the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovakia. In 2009 he was awarded with an honorary professorship at the Tianjin University in China. He published more than 300 papers and patents and he is widely known for his research in the field of polymer derived ceramics and on ultra high pressure synthesis of new materials. I-Wei Chen is currently Skirkanich Professor of Materials Innovation at the University of Pennsylvania since 1997, where he also gained his master's degree in 1975. He received his bachelor's degree in physics from Tsinghua University, Taiwan, in 1972, and earned his doctorate in metallurgy from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1980. He taught at the University of Michigan (Materials) during 1986-1997 and MIT (Nuclear Engineering; Materials) during 1980-1986. He began ceramic research studying martensitic transformations in zirconia nano crystals, which led to work on transformation plasticity, superplasticity, fatigue, grain growth and sintering in various oxides and nitrides. He is currently interested in nanotechnology of ferroelectrics, thin film memory devices, and nano particles for biomedical applications. A Fellow of American Ceramic Society (1991) and recipient of its Ross Coffin Purdy Award (1994), Edward C. Henry Award (1999) and Sosman Award (2006), he authored over 90 papers in the Journal of the American Ceramic Society (1986-2006). He also received Humboldt Research Award for Senior U.S. Scientists (1997).

Contents

Preface XV List of Contributors XVII Part I Powders 1 1 Powder Compaction by Dry Pressing 3 Rainer Oberacker 1.1 Introduction 3 1.2 Fundamental Aspects of Dry Pressing 3 1.3 Practice of Uniaxial Compaction 19 1.4 Practice of Isostatic Compaction 25 1.5 Granulation of Ceramic Powders 29 References 34 2 Tape Casting 39 Andreas Roosen 2.1 Use of the Tape Casting Process 39 2.2 Process Variations 41 2.3 Tape Casting Process 42 2.4 Components of the Slurry 44 2.5 Preparation of the Slurry and its Properties 51 2.6 Tape Casting 52 2.7 Machining, Metallization, and Lamination 55 2.8 Binder Burnout 56 2.9 Firing 56 2.10 Summary 58 References 58 3 Hydrothermal Routes to Advanced Ceramic Powders and Materials 63 Wojciech L. Suchanek and Richard E. Riman 3.1 Introduction to Hydrothermal Synthesis 63 3.2 Engineering Ceramic Synthesis in Hydrothermal Solution 69 3.3 Materials Chemistry of Hydrothermal Ceramic Powders 74 3.4 Ceramics Processed from Hydrothermally Synthesized Powders 80 3.5 Summary 88 References 88 4 Liquid Feed-Flame Spray Pyrolysis (LF-FSP) in the Synthesis of Single- and Mixed-Metal Oxide Nanopowders 97 Richard M. Laine 4.1 Introduction 97 4.2 Basic Concepts of Nanopowder Formation During LF-FSP 100 4.3 Can Nanoparticles Be Prepared That Consist of Mixed Phases? 104 4.4 Which Particle Morphologies Can be Accessed? 107 4.5 Can Nanopowders Be Doped? 110 References 116 5 Sol Gel Processing of Ceramics 121 Nicola Husing 5.1 Introduction 121 5.2 Principles of Sol Gel Processing 122 5.3 Porous Materials 126 5.4 Hybrid Materials 130 5.5 Bioactive Sol Gel Materials 133 References 137 Part II Densification and Beyond 141 6 Sintering 143 Suk-Joong L. Kang 6.1 Sintering Phenomena 143 6.2 Solid-State Sintering 144 6.3 Liquid-Phase Sintering 156 6.4 Summary 164 References 165 7 Hot Isostatic Pressing and Gas-Pressure Sintering 171 Michael J. Hoffmann, Stefan Funfschilling, and Deniz Kahraman 7.1 Introduction 171 7.2 Sintering Mechanisms with Applied Pressure 172 7.3 Silicon Nitride Ceramics: Comparison of Capsule HIP and Sinter-HIP Technology 175 7.4 Other Applications 182 References 185 8 Hot Pressing and Spark Plasma Sintering 189 Mats Nygren and Zhijian Shen 8.1 Introduction 189 8.2 Advantages of Sintering Under a Uniaxial Pressure 190 8.3 Conventional Hot Presses 193 8.4 SPS Set-Up 194 8.5 Unique Features and Advantages of the SPS Process 196 8.6 The Role of High Pressure 197 8.7 The Role of Rapid and Effective Heating 199 8.8 The Role of Pulsed Direct Current 202 8.9 Microstructural Prototyping by SPS 203 8.10 Potential Industrial Applications 213 References 213 9 Fundamentals and Methods of Ceramic Joining 215 K. Scott Weil 9.1 Introduction 215 9.2 Basic Phenomena in Ceramic Joining 216 9.3 Methods of Joining 227 9.4 Conclusions 243 References 243 10 Machining and Finishing of Ceramics 247 Eckart Uhlmann, Gregor Hasper, Thomas Hoghe, Christoph Hubert, Vanja Mihotovic, and Christoph Sammler 10.1 Introduction 247 10.2 Face and Profile Grinding 248 10.3 Current Status and Future Prospects 251 10.4 Double-Face Grinding with Planetary Kinematics 252 10.5 Ultrasonic-Assisted Grinding 256 10.6 Abrasive Flow Machining 261 10.7 Outlook 264 References 265 Part III Films and Coatings 267 11 Vapor-Phase Deposition of Oxides 269 Lambert Alff, Andreas Klein, Philipp Komissinskiy, and Jose Kurian 11.1 Introduction 269 11.2 Summary 289 References 289 12 Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition of Metal Oxide Films and Nanostructures 291 Sanjay Mathur, Aadesh Pratap Singh, Ralf Muller, Tessa Leuning, Thomas Lehnen, and Hao Shen 12.1 Introduction 291 12.2 Metal Oxide Film Deposition 300 12.3 The Precursor Concept in CVD 313 12.4 Metal Oxide Coatings 321 12.5 Summary 327 References 330 Part IV Manufacturing Technology 337 13 Powder Characterization 339 Wolfgang Sigmund, Vasana Maneeratana, and Shu-Hau Hsu 13.1 Introduction 339 13.2 Chemical Composition and Surface Characterization 343 13.3 Particle Sizing and Data Interpretation 354 13.4 Physical Properties 363 13.5 Summary 367 References 367 14 Process Defects 369 Keizo Uematsu 14.1 Introduction 369 14.2 Bulk Examination Methods 370 14.3 Characterization Methods for Green Compact 371 14.4 Process Defects in Ceramics 375 References 393 15 Nonconventional Polymers in Ceramic Processing: Thermoplastics and Monomers 395 John W. Halloran 15.1 Introduction: Ceramic Green Bodies as Filled Polymers 395 15.2 Thermoplastics in Ceramic Processing 396 15.3 A Brief Review of Thermoplastics Used in Ceramic Forming 397 15.4 Melt Spinning of Fibers 397 15.5 Single-Component Extrusion and Plastics Processing 398 15.6 Thermoplastic Green Machining 400 15.7 Thermoplastic Coextrusion 401 15.8 Crystallinity in Thermoplastics 403 15.9 Compounding Thermoplastic Blends 404 15.10 Volumetric Changes in Thermoplastic Ceramic Compounds 405 15.11 Polymer Formation by Polymerization of Suspensions in Monomers 407 15.12 Summary 410 References 411 16 Manufacturing Technology: Rapid Prototyping 415 James D. McGuffin-Cawley 16.1 Introduction 415 16.2 Outline of Ceramic Processing 418 16.3 Solid Freeform Fabrication 422 16.4 Additive Prototyping Processes 422 16.5 Sheet-Based Processes 427 16.6 Formative Prototyping Methods 427 16.7 Casting Methods 428 16.8 Plastic-Forming Methods 428 16.9 Subtractive Methods 429 16.10 Examples of SFF 429 16.11 Summary 432 References 432 Part V Alternative Strategies to Ceramics 439 17 Sintering of Nanograin Ceramics 441 I.-Wei Chen and Xiaohui Wang 17.1 Introduction 441 17.2 Background: What Went Wrong With Conventional Thinking? 442 17.3 Two-Step Sintering of Y2O3 445 17.4 Two-Step Sintering of Other Ceramics 451 17.5 Conclusions 453 References 454 18 Polymer-Derived Ceramics 457 Emanuel Ionescu 18.1 Introduction 457 18.2 Preceramic Polymers 457 18.3 Polymer-to-Ceramic Transformation 459 18.4 Processing Techniques for PDCs 462 18.5 High-Temperature Behavior of PDCs 470 18.6 Electrical Properties of PDCs 478 18.7 Magnetic Properties of PDCs 481 18.8 Polymer-Derived Ceramic Membranes 483 18.9 Microfabrication of PDC-Based Components for MEMS Applications 485 18.10 Summary and Outlook 491 References 492 19 High-Pressure Routes to Ceramics 501 Dmytro A. Dzivenko and Ralf Riedel 19.1 Introduction 501 19.2 Static High-Pressure Techniques 502 19.3 Shock-Wave Techniques 508 19.4 Synthesis of Cubic Silicon Nitride 511 References 513 Index 519

Product Details

  • ISBN13: 9783527311576
  • Format: Hardback
  • Number Of Pages: 554
  • ID: 9783527311576
  • weight: 1214
  • ISBN10: 3527311572

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