Construction Planning, Programming and Control (3rd Edition)

Construction Planning, Programming and Control (3rd Edition)

By: Peter Williams (author), Brian Cooke (author)Paperback

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Description

This book offers a clear explanation of the principles and practice of construction planning, programming and control during the preparation and construction stages of a project. The book is written in the context of current procurement and contractual arrangements and JCT2005, NEC3 and ICE7 contracts are covered. The statutory framework within which construction projects must be managed is explained and the topic of construction hazard and risk is covered in detail. A variety of programming techniques are explained and the development of safe construction sequences and methods is particularly emphasised. The control of time, money and resources are considered in a risk management context and a complete chapter is devoted to cash flow. The third edition has been extensively updated and extended to include new materials on: * Hazard identification * Risk assessment * Health and safety management * CDM 2007 * Construction sequences and method statements * Delay analysis * Waste management and Site Waste Management Plans The final three chapters are devoted to individual case studies which have been selected to illustrate the practical application of the principles explained in the book and to provide examples of current procedures adopted by major contractors. The content is designed to provide a clear and comprehensive text for undergraduates on construction management, surveying and civil engineering degree courses.

About Author

Brian Cooke MSc MCIOB is a former chartered civil engineer, quantity surveyor and principal lecturer in construction management. He has lectured widely on management and financial topics both in the UK and overseas. He is currently a visiting lecturer at the University of Salford. Peter Williams MSc is a former chartered builder, chartered quantity surveyor and principal lecturer. He is currently a writer, researcher, lecturer and consultant with particular interests in contracts and finance, delay analysis and health and safety management.

Contents

Preface xi INTRODUCTION 1 The construction industry 3 1.1 Introduction 3 1.2 Industry structure 3 1.3 Industry culture 4 1.4 Construction industry reports 5 1.5 The Latham reports 5 1.6 The Egan reports 8 1.7 The National Audit Office Report 10 2 Construction contracts 12 2.1 Contracts and planning 12 2.2 Contracts in use 13 2.3 The Housing Grants, Construction and Regeneration Act 1996 13 2.4 JCT Contracts 15 2.5 ICE Conditions 19 2.6 The Engineering and Construction Contract (NEC) 20 2.7 ACA Standard Form of Contract for Project Partnering PPC2000 21 3 Procurementmethods 23 3.1 Procurement criteria 23 3.2 The design process 24 3.3 Procurement options 26 3.4 Traditional procurement 26 3.5 Design and build 31 3.6 Management contracting 35 3.7 Construction management 36 3.8 The role of the project manager 39 3.9 Private finance initiative 40 3.10 Framework contracting 42 3.11 Prime contracting 44 3.12 Partnering 44 PART A PLANNING 4 Management and organisation 53 4.1 Management principles 53 4.2 Leadership styles 55 4.3 Project teams 56 4.4 Team building 57 4.5 The size of construction firms 58 4.6 The characteristics of firms 58 4.7 The small firm 59 4.8 The medium-sized firm 61 4.9 A business unit approach in a medium--large firm 64 4.10 The large firm 64 5 Tendering procedures 72 5.1 Introduction 72 5.2 Competitive tendering 72 5.3 Establishing contract leads 73 5.4 Tender pre-qualification 75 5.5 The tendering process 77 5.6 Procedures for a traditional competitive tender 78 5.7 Procedures for a design and build tender 80 5.8 Traditional competitive tendering 83 5.9 Decision to tender 83 5.10 Pre-tender arrangements 86 5.11 The site visit report 89 5.12 Tender enquiries to subcontractors and suppliers 91 5.13 Build-up of the estimate 92 5.14 Pre-tender method statement 94 5.15 Preparation of pre-tender programme 95 5.16 Build-up of contract preliminaries 96 5.17 Management adjudication of the estimate 98 5.18 Analysis of tender performance 101 6 Managing the supply chain 103 6.1 Supply chain integration 103 6.2 Lean construction 104 6.3 Fast-track construction 105 6.4 Subcontractors 106 6.5 Types of subcontractor -- traditional procurement 106 6.6 Types of subcontractor -- management procurement 108 6.7 Work package procurement 108 6.8 Forms of subcontract 113 6.9 Construction Industry Scheme 114 7 Managing risk 116 7.1 Risk in construction 116 7.2 The Turnbull Report 117 7.3 Project risk 117 7.4 Risk management 118 7.5 Risk assessment 119 7.6 Client risk 121 7.7 Contractor risk 123 7.8 Tendering risk 126 7.9 Health and safety risk 127 7.10 Fire risk 128 8 The planning process 130 8.1 Introduction 130 8.2 Lead times 131 8.3 Work breakdown structure 133 8.4 Planning stages 133 8.5 Project planning 135 8.6 Pre-tender planning 137 8.7 Pre-contract planning 137 8.8 Contract planning 138 8.9 Planning a project 139 9 Programming techniques 143 9.1 Introduction 143 9.2 Bar charts and linked bar charts 143 9.3 Network analysis 147 9.4 Relationships between arrow diagrams, precedence diagrams and linked bar charts 150 9.5 Arrow diagrams 151 9.6 Precedence diagrams 157 9.7 Line of balance (elemental trend analysis) 165 9.8 Time-chainage diagrams 181 9.9 Accelerating the project 186 PART B PROGRAMMING 10 Developing construction sequences 199 10.1 The thought process 199 10.2 Programme considerations 201 10.3 Resource considerations 205 10.4 Achieving continuity of work 205 10.5 Sequence studies 208 11 Method statements 219 11.1 Introduction 219 11.2 Definition 219 11.3 Preparation of method statements 221 11.4 Pre-tender method statement 221 11.5 Construction method statements 226 11.6 Safety method statements 232 12 Planning for safety 234 12.1 Introduction 234 12.2 Definitions 234 12.3 Legal framework 235 12.4 Health and safety policy 235 12.5 Health and safety management 238 12.6 The safety of site operations 239 12.7 Risk assessment 241 12.8 Hazard and risk 244 12.9 Planning the work 249 12.10 The Construction (Design and Management) Regulations (CDM) 1994 251 12.11 The CDM Regulations 2007 254 12.12 Health and safety training 261 12.13 Measuring performance 263 12.14 Enforcement of legislation 264 12.15 Accidents and incidents 266 12.16 Human factors 267 13 Planning the project 272 13.1 Introduction 272 13.2 Planning procedures within a large organisation 272 13.3 Pre-contract planning 273 13.4 Pre-contract meetings 275 13.5 Placing orders for subcontractors and suppliers 278 13.6 Site layout planning 279 13.7 The master programme 281 13.8 The target programme 283 13.9 Subcontractor programmes 286 13.10 Procurement programmes 286 13.11 Requirement schedules 291 13.12 Contract planning 294 14 Planning cash flow 300 14.1 Introduction 300 14.2 Client's cash flow 300 14.3 Contractor's cash flow 301 14.4 Cash flow forecasting 301 14.5 Credit terms in construction 303 14.6 Forecasting contract value 303 14.7 Forecasting the contractor's income 313 14.8 Movement of money 315 14.9 Working capital 319 14.10 Improving cash flow 319 14.11 Forecast value and cash flow example 322 PART C CONTROL 15 Project control procedures 329 15.1 Introduction 329 15.2 Control procedures within organisations 329 15.3 Definitions 331 15.4 Types of budgets 331 15.5 Preparing budgets 332 15.6 Contract budgets 332 15.7 Labour, plant and preliminaries budgets 333 15.8 Budget control procedures 336 15.9 Importance of site records 341 15.10 Meetings as part of the control process 342 15.11 Key performance indicators 346 16 Controlling time 348 16.1 Introduction 348 16.2 Time for completion 348 16.3 The contractor's programme 349 16.4 Milestones 350 16.5 Early warning systems 350 16.6 Progress and delay 351 16.7 Progress recording 353 16.8 Delay and disruption 358 16.9 Extensions of time 361 16.10 The 'as-planned' programme 366 16.11 The 'as-built' programme 367 16.12 Delay analysis 368 16.13 Delay and Disruption Protocol 368 16.14 Delay analysis methodologies 369 16.15 Delay analysis in practice 369 16.16 Project acceleration 375 17 Controlling money 378 17.1 Introduction 378 17.2 Reporting procedures 378 17.3 Monthly cost--value reporting 380 17.4 CVR terminology 380 17.5 Cost--value reports 384 17.6 CVR case study 390 17.7 Interim valuations using S curves 391 18 Controlling resources 394 18.1 Introduction 394 18.2 Labour control 395 18.3 Materials control 401 18.4 Plant control 408 18.5 The control and coordination of subcontractors 410 PART D CASE STUDIES 19 City Road project 425 19.1 Project description 425 19.2 Project details 425 19.3 Site constraints 425 19.4 Tender stage 429 19.5 Pre-contract stage 440 19.6 Contract stage 452 20 Eastlands project 457 20.1 Project description 457 20.2 Project details 457 20.3 Construction details 457 20.4 Organisation structure of the developer/contractor 459 20.5 Project planning 463 20.6 Method statement -- tower blocks A and B 463 21 Highway project 474 21.1 General description 474 21.2 Construction strategy 474 21.3 Method statement (simplified) 480 21.4 Clause 14 programme 484 Index 485

Product Details

  • ISBN13: 9781405183802
  • Format: Paperback
  • Number Of Pages: 502
  • ID: 9781405183802
  • weight: 830
  • ISBN10: 1405183802
  • edition: 3rd Edition

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