Critical Infrastructure Protection in Homeland Security: Defending a Networked Nation (2nd Edition)

Critical Infrastructure Protection in Homeland Security: Defending a Networked Nation (2nd Edition)

By: Ted G. Lewis (author)Hardback

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Description

"...excellent for use as a text in information assurance or cyber-security courses...I strongly advocate that professors...examine this book with the intention of using it in their programs." (Computing Reviews.com, March 22, 2007) "The book is written as a student textbook, but it should be equally valuable for current practitioners...this book is a very worthwhile investment." (Homeland Security Watch, August 17, 2006) While the emphasis is on the development of policies that lead to successful prevention of terrorist attacks on the nation's infrastructure, this book is the first scientific study of critical infrastructures and their protection. The book models the nation's most valuable physical assets and infrastructure sectors as networks of nodes and links. It then analyzes the network to identify vulnerabilities and risks in the sector combining network science, complexity theory, modeling and simulation, and risk analysis. The most critical components become the focus of deeper analysis and protection. This approach reduces the complex problem of protecting water supplies, energy pipelines, telecommunication stations, Internet and Web networks, and power grids to a much simpler problem of protecting a few critical nodes. The new edition incorporates a broader selection of ideas and sectors and moves the mathematical topics into several appendices.

About Author

Ted Lewis has over 35 published books to his credit, and extensive experience in both industry and academia. He served as a senior executive in DaimlerChrysler Corp, Eastman Kodak Company, and Oregon Advanced Computing Institute, as well as a professor of computer science at the University of Missouri-Rolla, University of Louisiana, Oregon State University, and the Naval Postgraduate School. Lewis was Editor-in-Chief of IEEE Software Magazine, IEEE Computer Magazine, and founded several of its periodicals.

Contents

Preface xiv How to Use this Book xvii Acknowledgment xix Part I Origins of Homeland Security and Critical Infrastructure Protection Policy 1 1 Origins of Critical Infrastructure Protection 3 1.1 Recognition, 4 1.2 Natural Disaster Recovery, 5 1.3 Definitional Phase, 7 1.4 Public Private Cooperation, 9 1.5 Federalism: Whole of Government, 10 1.6 Infrastructure Protection within DHS, 11 1.7 Implementing a Risk Strategy, 12 1.8 Analysis, 16 1.9 Exercises, 18 References, 19 Part II Theory and Foundations 21 2 R isk Strategies 23 2.1 EUT, 25 2.2 PRA and Fault Trees, 27 2.3 MBRA and Resource Allocation, 28 2.4 PRA in the Supply Chain, 31 2.5 Protection versus Response, 31 2.6 Threat is an Output, 32 2.7 Bayesian Belief Networks, 33 2.8 A BN for Threat, 33 2.9 Risk of a Natural Disaster, 34 2.10 Earthquakes, 35 2.11 Black Swans and Risk, 36 2.12 Black Swan Floods, 36 2.13 Are Natural Disasters Getting Worse? 37 2.14 Black Swan Al Qaeda Attacks, 37 2.15 Black Swan Pandemic, 38 2.16 Risk and Resilience, 40 2.17 Exercises, 41 References, 42 3 Theories of Catastrophe 43 3.1 NAT, 44 3.2 Blocks and Springs, 46 3.3 Bak s Punctuated Equilibrium Theory, 47 3.4 TOC, 50 3.5 The U.S. Electric Power Grid, 52 3.6 POE, 53 3.7 Competitive Exclusion, 56 3.8 POR, 58 3.9 Resilience of Complex Infrastructure Systems, 59 3.10 Emergence, 61 3.11 Exercises, 62 References, 63 4 Complex CIKR Systems 64 4.1 CIKR as Networks, 66 4.2 Cascading CIKR Systems, 73 4.3 Network Flow Resilience, 79 4.4 Paradox of Redundancy, 80 4.5 Network Risk, 83 4.6 Exercises, 88 Reference, 89 Part III Individua l Sectors 91 5 Communications 93 5.1 Early Years, 94 5.2 Regulatory Structure, 96 5.3 The Architecture of the Communication Sector, 98 5.4 Risk Analysis, 102 5.5 Cellular Network Threats, 108 5.6 Analysis, 109 5.7 Exercises, 109 References, 110 6 Internet 111 6.1 Internet as a Disruptive Technology, 113 6.2 The Autonomous System Network, 114 6.3 Origins of TCP/IP, 116 6.4 Internet Standards, 118 6.5 Toward Commercialization, 119 6.6 The WWW, 120 6.7 Internet Governance, 121 6.8 Analysis, 126 6.9 Exercises, 126 References, 127 7 Cyber Threats 128 7.1 Script Kiddies and Black-Hats, 129 7.2 Tools of the Trade, 130 7.3 Botnets, 138 7.4 Cyber Risk Analysis, 138 7.5 Cyber Infrastructure Risk, 140 7.6 Analysis, 142 7.7 Exercises, 143 References, 144 8 Information Technology 145 8.1 Principles of IT Security, 146 8.2 Enterprise Systems, 147 8.3 Cyber Defense, 148 8.4 Basics of Encryption, 151 8.5 Asymmetric Encryption, 153 8.6 RSA Illustrated, 156 8.7 PKI, 157 8.8 Countermeasures, 159 8.9 Exercises, 161 References, 162 9 Cybersecurity Policy 163 9.1 A National Priority and a (Familiar) Call to Arms, 164 9.2 Rewriting Cybersecurity Policy: The Difficulty of Reform, 167 9.3 Cybersecurity, Critical Infrastructure, and Public Policy: An Ongoing and Difficult Evolution, 174 9.4 Exercises, 176 References, 176 10 Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition 179 10.1 What is SCADA? 180 10.2 SCADA versus Enterprise Computing Differences, 181 10.3 Common Threats, 182 10.4 Who is in Charge? 183 10.5 SCADA Everywhere, 184 10.6 SCADA Risk Analysis, 185 10.7 San Francisco Public Utilities Commission SCADA Redundancy, 189 10.8 Analysis, 192 10.9 Exercises, 194 11 Water and Water Treatment 195 11.1 From Germs to Terrorists, 196 11.2 Foundations: SDWA of 1974, 198 11.3 The Bioterrorism Act of 2002, 199 11.4 The Architecture of Water Systems, 200 11.5 The Hetch Hetchy Network, 201 11.6 Cascade Analysis, 203 11.7 Hetch Hetchy Investment Strategies, 204 11.8 Hetch Hetchy Threat Analysis, 207 11.9 Analysis, 210 11.10 Exercises, 210 References, 212 12 Energy 213 12.1 Energy Fundamentals, 214 12.2 Regulatory Structure of the Energy Sector, 216 12.3 Interdependent Coal, 218 12.4 The Rise of Oil and the Automobile, 218 12.5 Energy Supply Chains, 220 12.6 The Critical Gulf of Mexico Cluster, 223 12.7 Threat Analysis of the Gulf of Mexico Supply Chain, 229 12.8 Network Analysis of the Gulf of Mexico Supply Chain, 230 12.9 The KeystoneXL Pipeline Controversy, 232 12.10 The NG Supply Chain, 232 12.11 Analysis, 234 12.12 Exercises, 234 References, 235 13 Electric Power 236 13.1 The Grid, 237 13.2 From Death Rays to Vertical Integration, 238 13.3 Out of Orders 888 and 889 Comes Chaos, 241 13.4 The North American Grid, 244 13.5 Anatomy of a Blackout, 246 13.6 Threat Analysis, 249 13.7 Risk Analysis, 251 13.8 Analysis of WECC, 252 13.9 Analysis, 254 13.10 Exercises, 255 References, 257 14 Healthcare and Public Health 258 14.1 The Sector Plan, 259 14.2 Roemer s Model, 260 14.3 The Complexity of Public Health, 262 14.4 Risk Analysis of HPH Sector, 263 14.5 Bioterrorism, 263 14.6 Epidemiology, 266 14.7 Predicting Pandemics, 267 14.8 Biosurveillance, 270 14.9 Network Pandemics, 272 14.10 The World Travel Network, 273 14.11 Exercises, 274 References, 276 15 Transportation 277 15.1 Transportation under Transformation, 279 15.2 The Road to Prosperity, 281 15.3 Rail, 284 15.4 Air, 288 15.5 Airport Games, 292 15.6 Exercises, 294 References, 295 16 Supply Chains 296 16.1 The World is Flat but Tilted, 297 16.2 The WTW, 301 16.3 Risk Assessment, 304 16.4 Analysis, 307 16.5 Exercises, 308 References, 308 17 Banking and Finance 310 17.1 The Financial System, 312 17.2 Financial Networks, 316 17.3 Virtual Currency, 318 17.4 Hacking the Financial Network, 320 17.5 Hot Money, 320 17.6 The End of Stimulus?, 323 17.7 Fractal Markets, 323 17.8 Exercises, 327 References, 329 Appendix A: Math: Probability Primer 330 A.1 A Priori Probability, 330 A.2 A Posteriori Probability, 332 A.3 Random Networks, 334 A.4 Conditional Probability, 334 A.5 Bayesian Networks, 335 A.6 Bayesian Reasoning, 336 References, 338 Further Reading, 338 Appendix B: Math: Risk and Resilience 340 B.1 EUT, 340 B.2 Bayesian Estimation, 342 B.3 Exceedence Probability and Probable Maximum Loss Risk, 344 B.4 Network Risk, 347 B.5 MBRA, 349 References, 353 Appendix C: Math: Spectral Radius 355 C.1 Network as Matrix, 355 C.2 Matrix Diagonalization, 355 C.3 Relationship to Risk and Resilience, 357 Appendix D: Math: Tragedy of the Commons 359 D.1 Lotka Volterra Model, 359 D.2 Hopf Holling Model, 359 Appendix E: Glossary 361 Index 363

Product Details

  • ISBN13: 9781118817636
  • Format: Hardback
  • Number Of Pages: 400
  • ID: 9781118817636
  • weight: 1176
  • ISBN10: 111881763X
  • edition: 2nd Edition

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