Designing with Objects: Object-Oriented Design Patterns Explained with Stories from Harry Potter

Designing with Objects: Object-Oriented Design Patterns Explained with Stories from Harry Potter

By: Avinash C. Kak (author)Paperback

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Description

Here is a book that takes the sting out of learning object-oriented design patterns! Using vignettes from the fictional world of Harry Potter, author Avinash C. Kak provides a refreshing alternative to the typically abstract and dry object-oriented design literature. Designing with Objects is unique. It explains design patterns using the short-story medium instead of sterile examples. It is the third volume in a trilogy by Avinash C. Kak, following Programming with Objects (Wiley, 2003) and Scripting with Objects (Wiley, 2008). Designing with Objects confronts how difficult it is for students to learn complex patterns based on conventional scenarios that they may not be able to relate to. In contrast, it shows that stories from the fictional world of Harry Potter provide highly relatable and engaging models. After explaining core notions in a pattern and its typical use in real-world applications, each chapter shows how a pattern can be mapped to a Harry Potter story. The next step is an explanation of the pattern through its Java implementation. The following patterns appear in three sections: Abstract Factory, Builder, Factory Method, Prototype, and Singleton; Adapter, Bridge, Composite, Decorator, Facade, Flyweight, and Proxy; and the Chain of Responsibility, Command, Interpreter, Iterator, Mediator, Memento, Observer, State, Strategy, Template Method, and Visitor. For readers use, Java code for each pattern is included in the book s companion website. * All code examples in the book are available for download on a companion website with resources for readers and instructors. * A refreshing alternative to the abstract and dry explanations of the object-oriented design patterns in much of the existing literature on the subject. * In 24 chapters, Designing with Objects explains well-known design patterns by relating them to stories from the fictional Harry Potter series

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About Author

Avinash C. Kak is Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Purdue University. His areas of interest include software engineering, computer and network security, sensor networks, and computer vision (especially with camera networks). Professor Kak has been awarded numerous Best Teacher of the Year awards at Purdue University. He is the author of Scripting with Objects and Programming with Objects, both published by Wiley.

Contents

PREFACE xiv ACKNOWLEDGMENTS xix 1 Why Learn Design Patterns and Why Do So with Help from Harry Potter? 1 1.1 The OO Design Patterns Bible by GoF 2 1.2 But What Has Harry Potter Got to Do with OO Design Patterns? 4 1.3 Is Familiarity with Harry Potter a Requirement for Understanding This Book? 6 1.4 How the Pattern Explanations are Organized 7 1.5 The Terminology of Object-Oriented Programming 7 1.6 The UML Notation Used in the Class Diagrams 12 1.6.1 Association as a Relationship Between Classes 14 1.6.2 Aggregation and Composition as Relationships Between Classes 15 1.6.3 Representing Attributes 16 1.6.4 Representing Operations 17 I CREATIONAL PATTERNS 19 2 Abstract Factory 21 2.1 The Concept of a Factory in Software 21 2.2 Intent and Applicability 22 2.3 Introduction to the Abstract Factory Pattern 22 2.4 The Abstract Factory Pattern in Real-World Applications 23 2.5 Harry Potter Story Used to Illustrate the Abstract Factory Pattern 23 2.6 A Top Level View of the Pattern Demonstration 25 2.7 The Abstract Class Factory 27 2.8 The Helper Class FactoryStore 27 2.9 The Abstract Class Enchanted 30 2.10 The Concrete Classes for Magical Objects 31 2.11 The Concrete Factory Classes 32 2.12 The Client Class Diagon AlleyRetailer 34 2.13 Playing with the Code 36 3 Builder 38 3.1 Building Complex Objects 38 3.2 Intent and Applicability 39 3.3 Introduction to the Builder Pattern 39 3.4 The Builder Pattern in Real-World Applications 41 3.5 Harry Potter Story Used to Illustrate the Builder Pattern 42 3.6 A Top-Level View of the Pattern Demonstration 43 3.7 The Abstract Class PotionMaker 45 3.8 The Concrete Extensions of PotionMaker 46 3.9 The Director Class 52 3.10 The Potion Class 54 3.11 The Ingredient Class 55 3.12 The PotionMakingFeasibilityViolation Class 55 3.13 The Client Class 55 3.14 Playing with the Code 56 4 Factory Method 59 4.1 Revisiting the Concept of a Factory in Software 59 4.2 Intent and Applicability 60 4.3 Introduction to the Factory Method Pattern 60 4.4 The Factory Method Pattern in Real-World Applications 61 4.5 Harry Potter Story Used to Illustrate the Factory Method Pattern 62 4.6 A Top Level View of the Pattern Demonstration 63 4.7 The Enchanted Class Hierarchy 65 4.8 The ArtifactFactory Class Hierarchy and the Factory Methods Contained Therein 68 4.9 The Client Class 70 4.10 Playing with the Code 71 5 Prototype 73 5.1 Why Not Make New Objects by Copying Old Objects? 73 5.2 Intent and Applicability 74 5.3 Introduction to the Prototype Pattern 74 5.4 The Prototype Pattern in Real-World Applications 77 5.5 Harry Potter Story Used to Illustrate The Prototype Pattern 78 5.6 A Top Level View of the Pattern Demonstration 79 5.7 The Dragon Class 81 5.8 The PrototypeManagerAndDuplicator Class 84 5.9 The DragonAficionado Class 87 5.10 The UnknownDragonException Class 88 5.11 Playing with the Code 88 6 Singleton 90 6.1 Singular Objects 90 6.2 Intent and Applicability 90 6.3 Introduction to the Singleton Pattern 91 6.4 The Singleton Pattern in Real-World Applications 91 6.5 Harry Potter Story Used to Illustrate the Singleton Pattern 92 6.6 A Top Level View of the Pattern Demonstration 92 6.7 The MinisterForMagic Class 93 6.8 The TestSingleton Class 94 6.9 Variations on the Singleton Pattern 95 6.10 Playing with the Code 97 II STRUCTURAL PATTERNS 99 7 Adapter 101 7.1 Getting Things to Work Together 101 7.2 Intent and Applicability 102 7.3 Introduction to the Adapter Pattern 102 7.4 The Adapter Pattern in Real-World Applications 103 7.5 Harry Potter Story Used to Illustrate the Adapter Pattern 104 7.6 A Top Level View of the Pattern Demonstration 104 7.7 The Target Interface: TeachingDADA 106 7.8 The TeacherForDADA Class 107 7.9 The AdapterForSafeTeaching Class 108 7.10 The Client Class SchoolOfMagic 110 7.11 Object Adapter 111 7.12 Pluggable Adapter 113 7.13 Playing with the Code 119 8 Bridge 122 8.1 Concepts and Their Implementation 122 8.2 Intent and Applicability 123 8.3 Introduction to the Bridge Pattern 123 8.4 The Bridge Pattern in Real-World Applications 126 8.5 Harry Potter Story Used to Illustrate the Bridge Pattern 127 8.6 A Top Level View of the Pattern Demonstration 130 8.7 The Humanoid Class 130 8.8 The Dementor, Goblin, and HouseElf Classes 132 8.9 The Humanoid Imp Class 134 8.10 Implementation Classes for the Dementor, Goblin, and HouseElf Classes 137 8.11 The Client Class MinistryOfMagic 139 8.12 Playing with the Code 140 9 Composite 142 9.1 Relationships That Loop Back 142 9.2 Intent and Applicability 143 9.3 Introduction to the Composite Pattern 144 9.4 The Composite Pattern in Real-World Applications 145 9.5 Harry Potter Story Used to Illustrate the Composite Pattern 146 9.6 A Top Level View of the Pattern Demonstration 147 9.7 The WizardTraits Interface 148 9.8 The Wizard Class 149 9.9 The Auror Class 152 9.10 The Obliviator Class 153 9.11 The DepartmentHead Class 155 9.12 The Minister for Magic Class 156 9.13 The Client Class Test 158 9.14 Playing with the Code 159 10 Decorator 161 10.1 Onion as a Metaphor 161 10.2 Intent and Applicability 162 10.3 Introduction to the Decorator Pattern 162 10.4 The Decorator Pattern in Real-World Applications 164 10.5 Harry Potter Story Used to Illustrate the Decorator Pattern 165 10.6 A Top Level View of the Pattern Demonstration 168 10.7 The CoreMessageDeliveryClass Class 170 10.8 The Decorator Classes 170 10.9 The Client Class Test 172 10.10 Playing with the Code 173 11 Facade 175 11.1 Hiding Complexity 175 11.2 Intent and Applicability 175 11.3 Introduction to the Facade Pattern 176 11.4 The Facade Pattern in Real-World Applications 177 11.5 Harry Potter Story Used to Illustrate the Facade Pattern 177 11.6 A Top Level View of the Pattern Demonstration 179 11.7 The Abstract Root Class Facade 181 11.8 The Network Class 183 11.9 The Node, Link, and Path Classes 193 11.10 The Three Concrete Facade Classes 198 11.11 Testing the Demonstration Code 203 11.12 Playing with the Code 207 12 Flyweight 212 12.1 The Idea of Customized Duplications 212 12.2 Intent and Applicability 213 12.3 Introduction to the Flyweight Pattern 213 12.4 The Flyweight Pattern in Real-World Applications 214 12.5 Harry Potter Story Used to Illustrate the Flyweight Pattern 214 12.6 A Top Level View of the Pattern Demonstration 215 12.7 The HeadMasterPortrait Class 218 12.8 The FlyweightImageStore Class 218 12.9 The ImageManager Class 219 12.10 The PortraitBorderChoices Class 225 12.11 The ImageNotAvailableException Class 226 12.12 The PortraitMakerAssignment Class 226 12.13 Playing with the Code 228 12.14 Acknowledgment 229 13 Proxy 230 13.1 Is It Always Necessary to Have the Real Thing? 230 13.2 Intent and Applicability 230 13.3 Introduction to the Proxy Pattern 231 13.4 The Proxy Pattern in Real-World Applications 232 13.5 Harry Potter Story Used to Illustrate the Proxy Pattern 233 13.6 A Top Level View of the Pattern Demonstration 235 13.7 The Abstract Class Wizard 235 13.8 The DarkWizardTraits Interface 237 13.9 The DarkWizard Class 238 13.10 The DarkLord Class 242 13.11 The ClientClass Class 245 13.12 Playing with the Code 246 III BEHAVIORAL PATTERNS 249 14 Chain of Responsibility 253 14.1 Passing the Buck 253 14.2 Intent and Applicability 254 14.3 Introduction to the Chain of Responsibility Pattern 254 14.4 The Chain of Responsibility Pattern in Real-World Applications 255 14.5 Harry Potter Story Used to Illustrate the Chain of Responsibility Pattern 256 14.6 A Top Level View of the Pattern Demonstration 258 14.7 The Interface Class Violations 260 14.8 The Abstract Class Adjudicator 261 14.9 The Player Class 263 14.10 The Classes with the Authority to Resolve Violations 265 14.11 Testing the Code 268 14.12 Playing with the Code 269 15 Command 272 15.1 Actions Versus the Actors 272 15.2 Intent and Applicability 273 15.3 Introduction to the Command Pattern 274 15.4 The Command Pattern in Real-World Applications 274 15.5 Harry Potter Story Used to Illustrate the Command Pattern 276 15.6 A Top Level View of the Pattern Demonstration 277 15.7 The Command Interface 279 15.8 The MyPlaces Interface 279 15.9 The ProtectHarryPotter Class 279 15.10 The Wizard Class 282 15.11 The Squib Class 284 15.12 The Invoker Class 285 15.13 The UnableToProtectHarryPotterException Class 286 15.14 The Client Class 286 15.15 Playing with the Code 288 16 Interpreter 290 16.1 Parsing versus Interpretation 290 16.2 Intent and Applicability 292 16.3 Introduction to the Interpreter Pattern 292 16.4 The Interpreter Pattern in Real-World Applications 293 16.5 Harry Potter Story Used to Illustrate the Interpreter Pattern 294 16.6 A Parser Front-End for the Interpreter Pattern 296 16.7 A Top Level View of the Pattern Demonstration 304 16.8 The Driver Class 307 16.9 The Interpreter Sentence Class 310 16.10 The Worker Classes for Interpretation 312 16.11 The Utility Class ShowSyntaxTree 315 16.12 Playing with the Code 316 17 Iterator 321 17.1 Storing Object Collections and Interacting with Them 321 17.2 Intent and Applicability 323 17.3 Introduction to the Iterator Pattern 323 17.4 The Iterator Pattern in Real-World Applications 324 17.5 Harry Potter Story Used to Illustrate the Iterator Pattern 325 17.6 A Top Level View of the Pattern Demonstration 326 17.7 A Utility Interface for Demonstrating the Iterator Pattern 328 17.8 The Iterator Interface 330 17.9 The Fresher Class 330 17.10 The SortingHat Class 334 17.11 The MagicCollection Interface 344 17.12 The MagicList and MagicSet Classes 344 17.13 The Class Range 349 17.14 Playing with the Code 349 17.15 Credits 352 18 Mediator 353 18.1 The Role of Mediation in Collaborative Problem Solving 353 18.2 Intent and Applicability 354 18.3 Introduction to the Mediator Pattern 354 18.4 The Mediator Pattern in Real-World Applications 355 18.5 Harry Potter Story Used to Illustrate the Mediator Pattern 357 18.6 A Top Level View of the Pattern Demonstration 357 18.7 The Abstract Class Mediator 359 18.8 The Interface TrialElements 360 18.9 The MinistryOfMagicTrialMediator Class 361 18.10 The Witness Class 366 18.11 The Trial Interface 367 18.12 The HarryPotterTrial Class 367 18.13 Playing with the Code 369 19 Memento 371 19.1 Recalling the Past 371 19.2 Intent and Applicability 372 19.3 Introduction to the Memento Pattern 372 19.4 The Memento Pattern in Real-World Applications 374 19.5 Harry Potter Story Used to Illustrate the Memento Pattern 374 19.6 A Top Level View of the Pattern Demonstration 377 19.7 The HogwartsHappening Class and The Inner Memento Class 378 19.8 The Client Class 380 19.9 Playing with the Code 384 20 Observer 386 20.1 Subscription-Based Broadcasting 386 20.2 Intent and Applicability 387 20.3 Introduction to the Observer Pattern 387 20.4 The Observer Pattern in Real-World Applications 388 20.5 Harry Potter Story Used to Illustrate the Observer Pattern 389 20.6 A Top Level View of the Pattern Demonstration 391 20.7 The Observer Interface 391 20.8 The Observable Interface 393 20.9 The DarkLord Class 393 20.10 The DeathEater Class 396 20.11 The GodProcess Class 399 20.12 Playing with the Code 401 21 State 405 21.1 Contextual Dependence of Behaviors 405 21.2 Intent and Applicability 406 21.3 Introduction to the State Pattern 406 21.4 The State Pattern in Real-World Applications 406 21.5 Harry Potter Story Used to Illustrate the State Pattern 407 21.6 A Top Level View of the Pattern Demonstration 408 21.7 The DADA State Interface 410 21.8 The Year-by-Year Implementation Classes for the State 411 21.9 The TeachingDADA Class 417 21.10 The Hogwarts Class 418 21.11 Playing with the Code 419 22 Strategy 421 22.1 Strategies in the Pursuit of Goals 421 22.2 Intent and Applicability 422 22.3 Introduction to the Strategy Pattern 422 22.4 The Strategy Pattern in Real-World Applications 423 22.5 Harry Potter Story Used to Illustrate the Strategy Pattern 424 22.6 A Top Level View of the Pattern Demonstration 425 22.7 The Abstract Root Class for Strategies: StrategyAbstractRoot 428 22.8 The Concrete Strategy Classes 429 22.9 The Champion Class 432 22.10 The SecondTaskManager Class 434 22.11 Playing with the Code 436 23 Template Method 437 23.1 Customizable Recipes 437 23.2 Intent and Applicability 438 23.3 Introduction to the Template Method Pattern 438 23.4 The Template Method Pattern in Real-World Applications 440 23.5 Harry Potter Story Used to Illustrate the Template Method Pattern 441 23.6 A Top Level View of the Pattern Demonstration 442 23.7 The Abstract Root of Narrative Generation Classes 444 23.8 Concrete Classes for Narrative Generation 445 23.9 The Executable Class 449 23.10 Playing with the Code 450 24 Visitor 453 24.1 Hooks, Good and Evil 453 24.2 Intent and Applicability 454 24.3 Introduction to the Visitor Pattern 454 24.4 The Visitor Pattern in Real-World Applications 457 24.5 Harry Potter Story Used to Illustrate the Visitor Pattern 457 24.6 A Top Level View of the Pattern Demonstration 459 24.7 The Visitor Interface 460 24.8 Two Concrete Implementations of the Visitor Interface 462 24.9 A Re-Implementation of the Wizard Hierarchy of the Composite Pattern 463 24.10 The Executable Class Client 469 24.11 Playing with the Code 470 REFERENCES 473 INDEX 474

Product Details

  • publication date: 06/02/2015
  • ISBN13: 9781118581209
  • Format: Paperback
  • Number Of Pages: 512
  • ID: 9781118581209
  • weight: 870
  • ISBN10: 1118581202

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