Hurricane Katrina and the Redefinition of Landscape

Hurricane Katrina and the Redefinition of Landscape

By: Demond Shondell Miller (author), Jason David Rivera (author)Paperback

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Description

Hurricane Katrina and the Redefinition of Landscape discusses the ways in which Hurricane Katrina and other such disasters that follow in the wake of large-scale natural phenomena have the ability to alter the physical and social landscapes of an area. Miller and Rivera emphasize the importance of the physical landscape and explore the ways in which any alteration to the landscape affects the economic, cultural, and political lives of the survivors. Through the example of Hurricane Katrina and the resulting devastation to New Orleans, Miller and Rivera suggest that economic and political policies should be more reflective of each unique physical location, thereby aiding in the development and sustainability of different cultures, economies, and political landscapes.

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About Author

DeMond Shondell Miller is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology and the director of the Liberal Arts and Sciences Institute for Research and Community Service at Rowan University in Glassboro, New Jersey. Jason David Rivera is a research associate at Rowan University in the Liberal Arts and Sciences Institute for Research and Community Service.

Contents

Chapter 1 Introduction Chapter 2 The Concepts of Place and Landscape Chapter 3 The Physical Landscape Chapter 4 The Cultural-Economic Landscape Chapter 5 The Political Landscape Chapter 6 Social Change Chapter 7 Civic Trust Chapter 8 Conclusion

Product Details

  • publication date: 16/07/2009
  • ISBN13: 9780739121474
  • Format: Paperback
  • Number Of Pages: 204
  • ID: 9780739121474
  • weight: 313
  • ISBN10: 0739121472

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  • Saver Delivery: Yes
  • 1st Class Delivery: Yes
  • Courier Delivery: Yes
  • Store Delivery: Yes

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