Impedance Source Power Electronic Converters (Wiley - IEEE)

Impedance Source Power Electronic Converters (Wiley - IEEE)

By: Yushin Liu (author), Poh Chiang Loh (author), Dr. Haitham Abu-Rub (author), Frede Blaabjerg (author), Omar Ellabban (author), Baoming Ge (author)Hardback

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Description

Impedance Source Power Electronic Converters brings together state of the art knowledge and cutting edge techniques in various stages of research related to the ever more popular impedance source converters/inverters. Significant research efforts are underway to develop commercially viable and technically feasible, efficient and reliable power converters for renewable energy, electric transportation and for various industrial applications. This book provides a detailed understanding of the concepts, designs, controls, and application demonstrations of the impedance source converters/inverters. Key features: * Comprehensive analysis of the impedance source converter/inverter topologies, including typical topologies and derived topologies. * Fully explains the design and control techniques of impedance source converters/inverters, including hardware design and control parameter design for corresponding control methods. * Presents the latest power conversion solutions that aim to advance the role of power electronics into industries and sustainable energy conversion systems. * Compares impedance source converter/inverter applications in renewable energy power generation and electric vehicles as well as different industrial applications. * Provides an overview of existing challenges, solutions and future trends. * Supported by calculation examples, simulation models and results. Highly accessible, this is an invaluable resource for researchers, postgraduate/graduate students studying power electronics and its application in industry and renewable energy conversion as well as practising R&D engineers. Readers will be able to apply the presented material for the future design of the next generation of efficient power electronic converters/inverters.

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About Author

Yushan Liu, Texas A&M University at Qatar, Qatar Dr Yushan Liu received her B.Sc. degree in automation from Beijing Institute of Technology (China) in 2008 and her Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Beijing Jiaotong University (China) in 2014. She is currently Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A&M University at Qatar. Her research interests include Z-source converters, cascade multilevel converters, photovoltaic power integration, renewable energy systems, and pulsewidth modulation techniques. Haitham Abu-Rub, Texas A&M University at Qatar, Qatar Dr Abu-Rub holds two PhD degrees, one in electrical engineering from Gdansk University of Technology, Poland, and the second in humanities from Gdansk University. Since 2006, Dr Abu-Rub has been an Associate Professor at Texas A&M University at Qatar. His main research interest is energy conversion systems and he is currently leading potential projects on PV and hybrid renewable power generation systems with different types of converters. He is the first author of three books, co-author of five book chapters, an active IEEE member and an editor of three IEEE Transactions. Baoming Ge, Texas A&M University, Texas, USA Dr Baoming Ge received his PhD degree in electrical engineering from Zhejiang University, China, in 2000. He is currently working simultaneously at the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department of Texas A&M University, USA, and within the School of Electrical Engineering at Beijing Jiaotong University where his research interests include renewable energy power generation, electrical machines and control, power electronics systems and control theories and applications. Dr Ge has published more than 150 Journal and Conference papers, authored one book and two book chapters, holds seven patents in topics of impedance source converters/inverters and sustainable energy and is an active IEEE member. Frede Blaabjerg, Aalborg University, Denmark Dr Frede Blaabjerg received his PhD degree from Aalborg University in 1988. He became an Assistant Professor in 1992, an Associate Professor in 1996, and a Full Professor of Power Electronics and Drives in 1998. His current research interests include power electronics and its applications such as in wind turbines, PV systems, reliability, harmonics and adjustable speed drives. Dr Blaabjerg has published approximately 300 journal papers in the field of power electronics and its applications, served as Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics between 2006 and 2012 and has won numerous prestigious awards for his work in power electronics. Omar Ellabban, Texas A&M University at Qatar, Qatar Dr Omar Ellabban received his B.Sc. degree in Electrical Machines and Power Engineering from Helwan University (Egypt) and his M.Sc. degree in Electrical Machines and Power Engineering from Cairo University (Egypt) and his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Vrije Universiteit Brussel (Belgium) in 1998, 2005, and 2011 respectively. In 2012, he joined Texas A&M University at Qatar, Doha, Qatar, as a Post-Doctoral Research Associate and an Assistant Research Scientist in 2013, where he is involved in different renewable energy projects. His current research interests include automatic control, motor drives, power electronics, electric vehicles, switched reluctance motor, renewable energy, and smart grid.

Contents

Preface xii Acknowledgment xiv Bios xv 1 Background and Current Status 1 1.1 General Introduction to Electrical Power Generation 1 1.1.1 Energy Systems 1 1.1.2 Existing Power Converter Topologies 5 1.2 Z Source Converter as Single Stage Power Conversion System 10 1.3 Background and Advantages Compared to Existing Technology 11 1.4 Classification and Current Status 13 1.5 Future Trends 15 1.6 Contents Overview 15 Acknowledgment 16 References 16 2 Voltage Fed Z Source/Quasi Z Source Inverters 20 2.1 Topologies of Voltage Fed Z Source/Quasi Z Source Inverters 20 2.2 Modeling of Voltage Fed qZSI 23 2.2.1 Steady State Model 23 2.2.2 Dynamic Model 25 2.3 Simulation Results 30 2.3.1 Simulation of qZSI Modeling 30 2.3.2 Circuit Simulation Results of Control System 31 2.4 Conclusion 33 References 33 3 Current Fed Z Source Inverter 35 3.1 Introduction 35 3.2 Topology Modification 37 3.3 Operational Principles 39 3.3.1 Current Fed Z Source Inverter 39 3.3.2 Current Fed Quasi Z Source Inverter 41 3.4 Modulation 44 3.5 Modeling and Control 46 3.6 Passive Components Design Guidelines 47 3.7 Discontinuous Operation Modes 48 3.8 Current Fed Z Source Inverter/Current Fed Quasi Z Source Inverter Applications 51 3.9 Summary 52 References 52 4 Modulation Methods and Comparison 54 4.1 Sinewave Pulse Width Modulations 54 4.1.1 Simple Boost Control 55 4.1.2 Maximum Boost Control 55 4.1.3 Maximum Constant Boost Control 56 4.2 Space Vector Modulations 57 4.2.1 Traditional SVM 57 4.2.2 SVMs for ZSI/qZSI 57 4.3 Pulse Width Amplitude Modulation 63 4.4 Comparison of All Modulation Methods 63 4.4.1 Performance Analysis 64 4.4.2 Simulation and Experimental Results 64 4.5 Conclusion 72 References 72 5 Control of Shoot Through Duty Cycle: An Overview 74 5.1 Summary of Closed Loop Control Methods 74 5.2 Single Loop Methods 75 5.3 Double Loop Methods 76 5.4 Conventional Regulators and Advanced Control Methods 76 References 77 6 Z Source Inverter: Topology Improvements Review 78 6.1 Introduction 78 6.2 Basic Topology Improvements 79 6.2.1 Bidirectional Power Flow 79 6.2.2 High Performance Operation 80 6.2.3 Low Inrush Current 80 6.2.4 Soft Switching 80 6.2.5 Neutral Point 82 6.2.6 Reduced Leakage Current 82 6.2.7 Joint Earthing 82 6.2.8 Continuous Input Current 82 6.2.9 Distributed Z Network 85 6.2.10 Embedded Source 85 6.3 Extended Boost Topologies 87 6.3.1 Switched Inductor Z Source Inverter 87 6.3.2 Tapped Inductor Z Source Inverter 93 6.3.3 Cascaded Quasi Z Source Inverter 94 6.3.4 Transformer Based Z Source Inverter 97 6.3.5 High Frequency Transformer Isolated Z Source Inverter 103 6.4 L Z Source Inverter 103 6.5 Changing the ZSI Topology Arrangement 105 6.6 Conclusion 109 References 109 7 Typical Transformer Based Z Source/Quasi Z Source Inverters 113 7.1 Fundamentals of Trans ZSI 113 7.1.1 Configuration of Current Fed and Voltage Fed Trans ZSI 113 7.1.2 Operating Principle of Voltage Fed Trans ZSI 116 7.1.3 Steady State Model 117 7.1.4 Dynamic Model 119 7.1.5 Simulation Results 121 7.2 LCCT ZSI/qZSI 122 7.2.1 Configuration and Operation of LCCT ZSI 122 7.2.2 Configuration and Operation of LCCT qZSI 124 7.2.3 Simulation Results 126 7.3 Conclusion 127 Acknowledgment 127 References 127 8 Z Source/Quasi Z Source AC DC Rectifiers 128 8.1 Topologies of Voltage Fed Z Source/Quasi Z Source Rectifiers 128 8.2 Operating Principle 129 8.3 Dynamic Modeling 130 8.3.1 DC Side Dynamic Model of qZSR 130 8.3.2 AC Side Dynamic Model of Rectifier Bridge 132 8.4 Simulation Results 134 8.5 Conclusion 137 References 137 9 Z Source DC DC Converters 138 9.1 Topologies 138 9.2 Comparison 140 9.3 Example Simulation Model and Results 141 References 147 10 Z Source Matrix Converter 148 10.1 Introduction 148 10.2 Z Source Indirect Matrix Converter (All Silicon Solution) 151 10.2.1 Different Topology Configurations 151 10.2.2 Operating Principle and Equivalent Circuits 153 10.2.3 Parameter Design of the QZS Network 156 10.2.4 QZSIMC (All Silicon Solution) Applications 157 10.3 Z Source Indirect Matrix Converter (Not All Silicon Solution) 158 10.3.1 Different Topology Configurations 158 10.3.2 Operating Principle and Equivalent Circuits 160 10.3.3 Parameter Design of the QZS Network 164 10.3.4 ZS/QZSIMC (Not All Silicon Solution) Applications 164 10.4 Z Source Direct Matrix Converter 167 10.4.1 Alternative Topology Configurations 167 10.4.2 Operating Principle and Equivalent Circuits 170 10.4.3 Shoot Through Boost Control Method 171 10.4.4 Applications of the QZSDMC 175 10.5 Summary 177 References 177 11 Energy Stored Z Source/Quasi Z Source Inverters 179 11.1 Energy Stored Z Source/Quasi Z Source Inverters 179 11.1.1 Modeling of qZSI with Battery 180 11.1.2 Controller Design 182 11.2 Example Simulations 188 11.2.1 Case 1: SOCmin < SOC < SOCmax 188 11.2.2 Case 2: Avoidance of Battery Overcharging 190 11.3 Conclusion 192 References 193 12 Z Source Multilevel Inverters 194 12.1 Z Source NPC Inverter 194 12.1.1 Configuration 194 12.1.2 Operating Principles 195 12.1.3 Modulation Scheme 200 12.2 Z Source/Quasi Z Source Cascade Multilevel Inverter 206 12.2.1 Configuration 206 12.2.2 Operating Principles 208 12.2.3 Modulation Scheme 209 12.2.4 System Level Modeling and Control 213 12.2.5 Simulation Results 219 12.3 Conclusion 224 Acknowledgment 224 References 224 13 Design of Z Source and Quasi Z Source Inverters 226 13.1 Z Source Network Parameters 226 13.1.1 Inductance and Capacitance of Three Phase qZSI 226 13.1.2 Inductance and Capacitance of Single Phase qZSI 227 13.2 Loss Calculation Method 233 13.2.1 H bridge Device Power Loss 233 13.2.2 qZS Diode Power Loss 236 13.2.3 qZS Inductor Power Loss 236 13.2.4 qZS Capacitor Power Loss 237 13.3 Voltage and Current Stress 237 13.4 Coupled Inductor Design 239 13.5 Efficiency, Cost, and Volume Comparison with Conventional Inverter 239 13.5.1 Efficiency Comparison 239 13.5.2 Cost and Volume Comparison 240 13.6 Conclusion 242 References 243 14 Applications in Photovoltaic Power Systems 244 14.1 Photovoltaic Power Characteristics 244 14.2 Typical Configurations of Single Phase and Three Phase Systems 245 14.3 Parameter Design Method 245 14.4 MPPT Control and System Control Methods 248 14.5 Examples Demonstration 249 14.5.1 Single Phase qZS PV System and Simulation Results 249 14.5.2 Three Phase qZS PV Power System and Simulation Results 249 14.5.3 1 MW/11 kV qZS CMI Based PV Power System and Simulation Results 250 14.6 Conclusion 253 References 255 15 Applications in Wind Power 256 15.1 Wind Power Characteristics 256 15.2 Typical Configurations 257 15.3 Parameter Design 257 15.4 MPPT Control and System Control Methods 259 15.5 Simulation Results of a qZS Wind Power System 261 15.6 Conclusion 264 References 265 16 Z Source Inverter for Motor Drives Application: A Review 266 16.1 Introduction 266 16.2 Z Source Inverter Feeding a Permanent Magnet Brushless DC Motor 269 16.3 Z Source Inverter Feeding a Switched Reluctance Motor 270 16.4 Z Source Inverter Feeding a Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor 273 16.5 Z Source Inverter Feeding an Induction Motor 276 16.5.1 Scalar Control (V/F) Technique for ZSI IM Drive System 276 16.5.2 Field Oriented Control Technique for ZSI IM Drive System 279 16.5.3 Direct Torque Control (DTC) Technique for ZSI IM Drive System 279 16.5.4 Predictive Torque Control for ZSI IM Drive System 283 16.6 Multiphase Z Source Inverter Motor Drive System 283 16.7 Two Phase Motor Drive System with Z Source Inverter 286 16.8 Single Phase Induction Motor Drive System Using Z Source Inverter 286 16.9 Z Source Inverter for Vehicular Applications 286 16.10 Conclusion 289 References 290 17 Impedance Source Multi Leg Inverters 295 17.1 Impedance Source Four Leg Inverter 295 17.1.1 Introduction 295 17.1.2 Unbalanced Load Analysis Based on Fortescue Components 296 17.1.3 Effects of Unbalanced Load Condition 297 17.1.4 Inverter Topologies for Unbalanced Loads 300 17.1.5 Z Source Four Leg Inverter 302 17.1.6 Switching Schemes for Three Phase Four Leg Inverter 310 17.1.7 Buck/Boost Conversion Modes Analysis 316 17.2 Impedance Source Five Leg (Five Phase) Inverter 319 17.2.1 Five Phase VSI Model 319 17.2.2 Space Vector PWM for a Five Phase Standard VSI 322 17.2.3 Space Vector PWM for Five Phase qZSI 323 17.2.4 Discontinuous Space Vector PWM for Five Phase qZSI 324 17.3 Summary 326 References 326 18 Model Predictive Control of Impedance Source Inverter 329 18.1 Introduction 329 18.2 Overview of Model Predictive Control 330 18.3 Mathematical Model of the Z Source Inverters 331 18.3.1 Overview of Topologies 331 18.3.2 Three Phase Three Leg Inverter Model 333 18.3.3 Three Phase Four Leg Inverter Model 335 18.3.4 Multiphase Inverter Model 338 18.4 Model Predictive Control of the Z Source Three Phase Three Leg Inverter 342 18.5 Model Predictive Control of the Z Source Three Phase Four Leg Inverter 349 18.5.1 Discrete Time Model of the Output Current for Four Leg Inverter 349 18.5.2 Control Algorithm 350 18.6 Model Predictive Control of the Z Source Five Phase Inverter 350 18.6.1 Discrete Time Model of the Five Phase Load 352 18.6.2 Cost Function for the Load Current 353 18.6.3 Control Algorithm 353 18.7 Performance Investigation 353 18.8 Summary 359 References 359 19 Grid Integration of Quasi Z Source Based PV Multilevel Inverter 362 19.1 Introduction 362 19.2 Topology and Modeling 363 19.3 Grid Synchronization 364 19.4 Power Flow Control 365 19.4.1 Proportional Integral Controller 366 19.4.2 Model Predictive Control 372 19.5 Low Voltage Ride Through Capability 379 19.6 Islanding Protection 381 19.6.1 Active Frequency Drift (AFD) 383 19.6.2 Sandia Frequency Shift (SFS) 383 19.6.3 Slip Mode Frequency Shift (SMS) 383 19.6.4 Simulation Results 384 19.7 Conclusion 387 References 387 20 Future Trends 390 20.1 General Expectation 390 20.1.1 Volume and Size Reduction by Wide Band Gap Devices 390 20.1.2 Parameters Minimization for Single Phase qZS Inverter 391 20.1.3 Novel Control Methods 392 20.1.4 Future Applications 392 20.2 Illustration of Using Wide Band Gap Devices 393 20.2.1 Impact on Z Source Network 394 20.2.2 Analysis and Evaluation of SiC Device Based qZSI 395 20.3 Conclusion 398 References 398 Index 401

Product Details

  • publication date: 07/10/2016
  • ISBN13: 9781119037071
  • Format: Hardback
  • Number Of Pages: 424
  • ID: 9781119037071
  • weight: 802
  • ISBN10: 1119037077

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