Inorganic Chemistry in Focus III

Inorganic Chemistry in Focus III

By: Lars Wesemann (editor), Dieter Naumann (editor), Gerd Meyer (editor)Paperback

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Description

Metal clusters are on the brink between molecules and nanoparticles in size. With molecular, nano-scale, metallic as well as non-metallic aspects, metal clusters are a growing, interdisciplinary field with numerous potential applications in chemistry, catalysis, materials and nanotechnology. This third volume in the series of hot topics from inorganic chemistry covers all recent developments in the field of metal clusters, with some 20 contributions providing an in-depth view. The result is a unique perspective, illustrating all facets of this interdisciplinary area: * Inter-electron Repulsion and Irregularities in the Chemistry of Transition Series * Stereochemical Activity of Lone Pairs in Heavier Main Group Element Compounds * How Close to Close Packing? * Forty-Five Years of Praseodymium Diiodide * Centered Zirconium Clusters * Titanium Niobium Oxychlorides * Trinuclear Molybdenum and Tungsten Cluster Chalcogenides * Current State of (B,C,N)-Compounds of Calcium and Lanthanum * Ternary Phases of Lithium with Main-Group and Late-Transition Metals * Polar Intermetallics and Zintl Phases along the Zintl Border * Rare Earth Zintl Phases * Structure-Property Relationships in Intermetallics * Ternary and Quaternary Niobium Arsenide Zintl Phases * The Building Block Approach to Understanding Main-Group-Metal Complex Structures * Cation-Deficient Quaternary Thiospinels * A New Class of Hybrid Materials via Salt Inclusion Synthesis * Layered Perrhenate and Vanadate Hybrid Solids * Hydrogen Bonding in Metal Halides * Syntheses and Catalytic Properties of Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles * Solventless Thermolysis * New Potential Scintillation Materials in Borophosphate Systems. With its didactical emphasis, this volume addresses a wide readership, such that both students and specialists will profit from the expert contributions.

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About Author

Gerd Meyer studied chemistry at the Justus-Liebig University in Giessen under the supervision of Rudolf Hoppe. He gained his doctorate in 1976, and in 1980 worked with John D. Corbett at Iowa State University. In 1982 he gained his lecturing qualification in inorganic chemistry at Giessen, becoming a Full Professor at the University of Hanover in 1988. He subsequently moved to the same position at the University of Cologne in 1996. Professor Meyer's main research interests focus on solid-state and coordination chemistry of rare-earth elements and transition elements. Dieter Naumann studied chemistry at the Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule (RWTH) at Aachen. His diploma (1967) and doctoral theses (1969) were supervised by Martin Schmeisser. Research on perfluoroalkyl iodine compounds led to his lecturing qualification in inorganic chemistry at the University of Dortmund in 1975. From 1967 until 1989 he was a professor in Dortmund, becoming a Full Professor of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry at the University of Cologne in 1989. His main research interests are syntheses of fluoroorgano groups 10 to 18 element compounds. Lars Wesemann studied chemistry at the Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule in Aachen. His diploma and doctoral theses were supervised by Gerhard E. Herberich, and he gained the latter in 1990. After that he worked in Dietmar Seyferth's group at MIT for one year before returning to the RWTH Aachen. Independent research led him to his lecturing qualification in inorganic chemistry in 1997. He was a Professor of Inorganic Chemistry at the University of Cologne from 1999 until 2003, and is now a Full Professor at the University of Tubingen.

Contents

Dedicated. In Praise of Synthesis. Preface. List of Contributors. Biographical Sketches. 1 Inter-electron Repulsion and Irregularities in the Chemistry of Transition Series (David A. Johnson). 1.1 Introduction: Irregularities in Lanthanide Chemistry. 1.2 A General Principle of Lanthanide Chemistry. 1.3 Extensions of the First Part of the Principle. 1.4 Extensions of the Second Part of the Principle. 1.5 The Tetrad Effect. 1.6 The Diad Effect. References. 2 Stereochemical Activity of Lone Pairs in Heavier Main-group Element Compounds (Anja-Verena Mudring). 2.1 Introduction. 2.2 When Does a Lone Pair of Electrons Become Stereochemically Active? - Observations. 2.3 Theoretical Concepts. 2.4 Conclusions. Acknowledgments. References. 3 How Close to Close Packing? (Hideo Imoto). 3.1 Introduction. 3.2 Essential Features of Close Packing. 3.3 Parameter Definitions. 3.4 Correlation Between D and N. 3.5 Transformation of Close-packing Arrangements. 3.6 Close-packing of Cations or of Anions? 3.7 What Determines the Structure? Appendix. ICSD Codes, D and N Parameters of the Structures Used. References. 4 Forty-five Years of Praseodymium Di-iodide, PrI2 (Gerd Meyer and Andriy Palasyuk). Foreword. 4.1 Introduction. 4.2 Phases and Structures in the System Praseodymium-Iodine. 4.3 PrI2: Phases and Phase Analysis. 4.4 Conclusions. Acknowledgments. References. 5 Centered Zirconium Clusters: Mixed-halide Systems (Martin Kockerling). Foreword. 5.1 The Basics of Zirconium Cluster Chemistry. 5.2 Motivation. 5.3 Mixed-Chloride-Iodide Zirconium Cluster Phases with a 6:12-Metal :Halide Ratio. 5.4 Mixed Chloride-Iodide Zirconium Cluster Phases with a 6: 13 Metal :Halide Ratio. 5.5 Mixed Chloride-Iodide Zirconium Cluster Phases with a 6: 14 Metal :Halide Ratio. 5.6 Mixed Chloride-Iodide Zirconium Cluster Phases with a 6: 15 Metal :Halide Ratio. 5.7 Mixed Chloride-Iodide Zirconium Cluster Phases with a 6: 18 Metal :Halide Ratio - Products from Solid-state Reactions. 5.8 Outlook. Acknowledgments. References. 6 Titanium Niobium Oxychlorides: Ligand Combination Strategy for the Preparation of Low-dimensional Metal Cluster Materials (Ekaterina V. Anokhina and Abdessadek Lachgar). Abstract. 6.1 Introduction. 6.2 Overview of the Chemistry of Niobium Chloride and Niobium Oxide Cluster Compounds. 6.3 Niobium Oxychloride Cluster Compounds. 6.4 Summary of Crystallographic Data on Titanium Niobium Oxychlorides. 6.5 Electronic Configuration of Niobium Oxychloride Clusters. 6.6 Conclusion and Outlook. References. 7 Trinuclear Molybdenum and Tungsten Cluster Chalcogenides: From Solid State to Molecular Materials (Rosa Llusar and Cristian Vicent). 7.1 Introduction. 7.2 Synthesis and Structure of Molecular M3Q4 and M3Q7 Cluster Complexes. 7.3 Trinuclear Clusters as Building Units. Acknowledgments. References. 8 Current State on (B,C,N) Compounds of Calcium and Lanthanum (H.-Jurgen Meyer). 8.1 Introduction. 8.2 Problems and Pitfalls of some Calcium Compounds with (mixed) B,C,N Anions. 8.3 Metal-nitridoborates. 8.4 Lanthanum Nitridoborates. 8.5 Outlook. Acknowledgments. References. 9 Compositional, Structural and Bonding Variations in Ternary Phases of Lithium with Main-group and Late-transition Elements (Claude H. Belin, Monique Tillard). 9.1 Introduction. 9.2 Tuning Structures and Properties in Lithium Binary and Ternary Systems. 9.3 Clustering in Condensed Lithium Ternary Phases: A Way Towards Quasicrystals. 9.4 Exploration of New Lithium Ternary Systems Containing Ag, Zn, Al, Si, Ge. 9.5 The Intermetallic Li-Zn-Ge System, from Electron-poor to Electron-rich Phases. 9.6 Concluding Remarks. References. 10 Polar Intermetallics and Zintl Phases along the Zintl Border (Arnold M. Guloy). 10.1 "First comes the synthesis " - J. D. Corbett. 10.2 What are Intermetallics? 10.3 The Zintl-Klemm Concept. 10.4 "Electron-poor" Polar Intermetallics. 10.5 Intermetallic -Systems. 10.6 Some Final Remarks. References. 11 Rare-earth Zintl Phases: Novel Magnetic and Electronic Properties (Susan M. Kauzlarich and Jiong Jiang). 11.1 Introduction. 11.2 Structure. 11.3 Resistivity. 11.4 Magnetic Properties. 11.5 Magnetoresistance. 11.6 Summary. Acknowledgments. References. 12 Understanding Structure-forming Factors and Theory-guided Exploration of Structure-Property Relationships in Intermetallics (Dong-Kyun Seo, Li-Ming Wu and Sang-Hwan Kim). 12.1 Introduction. 12.2 Mn14Al56+xGe3-x (x=0.00, 0.32, 0.61). 12.3 La5-xCaxGe4 (x=3.37, 3.66, 3.82) and Ce5-xCaxGe4 (x=3.00, 3.20, 3.26). 12.4 Concluding Remarks. Acknowledgments. References. 13 Ternary and Quaternary Niobium Arsenide Zintl Phases (Franck Gascoin and Slavi C. Sevov). 13.1 Introduction. 13.2 New Main-group Arsenides. 13.3 Compounds Based on Isolated [NbAs4] Tetrahedral Centers. 13.4 Compounds Based on Edge-sharing Dimers of [NbAs4] Tetrahedra. References. 14 The Building-block Approach to Understanding Main-group-metal Complex Structures - More than just "Attempting to Hew Blocks with a Razor" (Peter K. Dorhout). 14.1 Introduction. 14.2 The Building-block Approach. 14.3 Summary. References. 15 Cation-deficient Quaternary Thiospinels (Ashok K. Ganguli, Shalabh Gupta and Gunjan Garg). 15.1 Introduction. 15.2 Cu5.5Si1.5Fe4Sn12S32. 15.3 Cu5.47Fe2.9Sn13.1S32. 15.4 Cu7.38Mn4Sn12S32 (1) and Cu7.07Ni4Sn12S32 (2). 15.5 Conclusions. References. 16 A New Class of Hybrid Materials via Salt-inclusion Synthesis (Shiou-Jyh Hwu). 16.1 Introduction. 16.2 General Approach to Salt-inclusion Synthesis. 16.3 Examples and Discussion. 16.4 Final Remarks. Acknowledgments. References. 17 Layered Perrhenate and Vanadate Hybrid Solids: On the Utility of Structural Relationships (Paul A. Maggard and Bangbo Yan). 17.1 Introduction. 17.2 Heterometallic Perrhenates. 17.3 Heterometallic Vanadates. 17.4 Conclusions. Acknowledgments. References. 18 Hydrogen Bonding in Metal Halides: Lattice Effects and Electronic Distortions (James D. Martin). 18.1 Introduction. 18.2 A Hierarchy of Structure-directing Forces. 18.3 Hydrogen Bond Influence on Melts and Crystallization. 18.4 Electronic Implications of Hydrogen Bonding. 18.5 Conclusions. Acknowledgments. References. 19 Syntheses and Catalytic Properties of Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles (Stefan Kaskel). 19.1 Introduction. 19.2 Synthesis of TiN Nanoparticles. 19.3 Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles in Hydrogen Storage Applications. 19.4 Catalytic Properties of TiN Nanoparticles in Solution. 19.5 Catalytic Properties. References. 20 Solventless Thermolysis: A Possible Bridge Between Crystal Structure and Nanosynthesis? (Ling Chen and Li-Ming Wu). 20.1 Introduction. 20.2 Synthesis Methods. 20.3 Solventless Thermolysis and Some Examples. 20.4 Control of the Nanoproduct Morphology Through the State of the Precursor. 20.5 Crystal Structure of the Precursor versus the Morphology and Distribution of the As-synthesized Nanoproduct: A Possible Bridge Between these Two? 20.6 Conclusion and Prospects. Acknowledgment. References. 21 New Potential Scintillation Materials in Borophosphate Systems (Jing-Tai Zhao and Cheng-Jun Duan). 21.1 Introduction. 21.2 Recent Studies on the Scintillation Luminescence Properties of Borophosphates. 21.3 Outlook. References. Subject Index.

Product Details

  • publication date: 04/08/2006
  • ISBN13: 9783527315109
  • Format: Paperback
  • Number Of Pages: 375
  • ID: 9783527315109
  • weight: 718
  • ISBN10: 3527315101

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