Institutional Change for Sustainable Development

Institutional Change for Sustainable Development

By: Robin Connor (author), Stephen Dovers (author)Hardback

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This volume presents a flexible conceptual framework for comprehending institutional dimensions of sustainability, emphasising the complexity of instututional systems, and highlighting the interdependence between policy learning and institutional change. This framework is applied and developed through the analysis of five significant arenas of institutional and policy change: environmental policy in the EU; New Zealand's Councils for Sustainable Development Act; and transformative property rights instruments. From these explorations, key principles for insitutional change are identified, including the institutional change; reiteration and learning; integration in policy and practice; subsidarity; and legal change.

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Part I Approaching institutional change and policy learning: conceptions of institutions and policy learning; operationalizing learning. Part II Case studies in institutional change: environmental policy in the European Union; sustainable management of natural and physical resources - the New Zealand Resource Management Act 1991; national councils for sustainable development - experiments in national policy development and integration; strategic environmental assessment - policy integration as practice ot possibility?; property rights instruments - transformative policy options. Part III Conclusions: principles and elements of institutional change for sustainable development.

Product Details

  • publication date: 28/01/2004
  • ISBN13: 9781843765691
  • Format: Hardback
  • Number Of Pages: 264
  • ID: 9781843765691
  • weight: 567
  • ISBN10: 1843765691

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