Le Jazz: Jazz and French Cultural Identity

Le Jazz: Jazz and French Cultural Identity

By: Matthew F. Jordan (author)Hardback

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About Author

Matthew F. Jordan is an assistant professor of film, video, and media studies at The Pennsylvania State University.

Product Details

  • publication date: 25/03/2010
  • ISBN13: 9780252035166
  • Format: Hardback
  • Number Of Pages: 312
  • ID: 9780252035166
  • weight: 522
  • ISBN10: 025203516X

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