Lexical Functions in Lexicography and Natural Language Processing (Studies in Language Companion Series 31)

Lexical Functions in Lexicography and Natural Language Processing (Studies in Language Companion Series 31)

By: Leo Wanner (editor)Hardback

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Description

Lexical Functions in Lexicography and Natural Language Processing is entirely devoted to the topic of Lexical Functions, which have been introduced in the framework of the Meaning-Text Theory (MTT) as a means for describing restricted lexical co-occurrence and derivational relations. It provides detailed background information, comparative studies of other known proposals for the representation of relations covered by Lexical Functions, as well as a selection of most important works done on and with Lexical Functions in lexicography and computational linguistics. This volume provides excellent course material while it also reports on the state-of-the-art in the field.

Contents

1. Abbreviations and Notations; 2. Introduction (by Wanner, Leo); 3. 1 On lf Relations; 4. 1.1 Paradigmatic lf Relations; 5. 1.2 Syntagmatic lf Relations; 6. 2 Lexical Functions in the Overall Framework of mtt; 7. 3 Outline of the Volume; 8. Lexical Functions: A Tool for the Description of Lexical Relations in a Lexicon (by Mel'cuk, Igor); 9. 1 Preliminary Remarks; 10. 2 On the Concept of Lexical Function; 11. 3 Simple Standard Lexical Functions; 12. 3.1 Classification of Simple Standard lfs; 13. 3.2 List of Simple Standard lfs; 14. 4 Special Phenomena Related to Lexical Functions; 15. 4.1 Complex lfs; 16. 4.2 Configurations of lfs; 17. 4.3 Fused Elements of Values of lfs; 18. 5 Presentation of the Values of lfs in Lexical Entries; 19. 5.1 Elements of the Value f() as Subentries in L's Entry; 20. 5.2 Generalizing over the Values of lfs; 21. 6 Linguistic Nature of Lexical Functions; 22. 6.1 Semantic Aspect of lfs; 23. 6.2 Phraseological Aspect of lfs; 24. 6.3 Ls in Linguistic Representations; 25. 6.4 Universality of lfs; 26. 6.5 New Simple Standard lfs?; 27. 7 Lexical Functions in Computer Applications; 28. 7.1 Ls and Lexical Choices; 29. 7.2 Ls and Communicative Structure; 30. 7.3 Ls and Text Cohesion; 31. Lexical Functions Across Languages (by Grimes, Joseph E.); 32. 1 Introduction; 33. 2 Lexical Functions Are a Heuristic Tool; 34. 3 Why Do Lexical Functions Work?; 35. Using Lexical Functions for the Extraction of Collocations from Dictionaries and Corpora (by Heid, Ulrich); 36. 1 Introduction; 37. 2 Automatic Exploration of Language Resources; 38. 2.1 Analysis of Dictionary Articles; 39. 2.2 Analysis of Text Corpora; 40. 2.3 Collocation Discovery in Linguistic Resources: Dictionaries vs. Corpora; 41. 3 Exploiting lf Definitions for Discovery Procedures; 42. 3.1 Part of speech Combinations in Syntagmatic lfs; 43. 3.2 Using the Definitions of Operi, Funci, and Laborij for Corpus Exploration; 44. 3.3 Exploiting Correlations between Semantic and Collocational Properties for Corpus Exploration Purposes; 45. 4 Extracting Collocations from Dictionaries; 46. 4.1 Problems of the Representation of Collocations in Dictionaries; 47. 4.2 An Analysis of a Few Collocationally Rich Dictionaries; 48. 4.3 Collocation Extraction from Definition Dictionaries; 49. 4.4 Augmenting Lexical Descriptions with Information from Text Corpora; 50. 5 Summary; 51. A Classification and Description of Lexical Functions for the Analysis of their Combinations (by Alonso Ramos, Margarita); 52. 1 Introduction; 53. 2 Classification of Lexical Functions; 54. 2.1 Brief Review of Previous Classifications of lfs; 55. 2.2 A New Classification of lfs; 56. 2.3 Justification of Our Classification; 57. 3 Descriptive Parameters; 58. 3.1 Semantic Parameters; 59. 3.2 Syntactic Categories; 60. 4 Combinations of Lexical Functions; 61. 4.1 Complex lfs; 62. 4.2 Compound lfs; 63. 4.3 LF Configurations; 64. 4.4 Internal Syntax of lf Combinations; 65. 5 Conclusion; 66. A Case of Aspectual Polysemy, with Implications for Lexical Functions (by Nakhimovsky, Alexander); 67. 1 Introduction; 68. 2 Telic and Atelic Readings; 69. 3 Atelic Perfectives in Russian; 70. 4 Aspectual Functions of Oper1 in English; 71. 5 Lexical Functions and Grammatical Meanings; 72. On Dictionary Entries for Support Verbs: The Cases of Russian VESTI, PROVODIT' and PROIZVODIT' (by Reuther, Tilmann); 73. 1 Focussing on the Problem; 74. 2 Examples from the tks and the Deribas Glossary; 75. 2.1 Tks; 76. 2.2 Deribas Glossary; 77. 3 Semantic Links of Operi-Verbs; 78. 3.1 Vesti; 79. 3.2 Provodit'/Provesti; 80. 3.3 Proizvodit'/Proizvesti; 81. 3.4 Support Verb Semantics: Step 1; 82. 4 Semantic Groups of Nouns in Oper-Collocations; 83. 4.1 Vesti; 84. 4.2 Provodit'/Provesti; 85. 4.3 Proizvodit'/Proizvesti; 86. 4.4 Support Verb Semantics: Step 2; 87. 5 Contextual Factors for the Choice of Support Verbs; 88. 5.1 Context Expressed by Adverbials of Time; 89. 5.2 Context Expressed by Adverbials of Manner and Instrument; 90. 6 Lexical Entries for the Support Verb vesti in the ecd Format; 91. 7 Concluding Remarks; 92. Lexical Functions and Lexical Inheritance for Emotion Lexemes in German (by Mel'cuk, Igor); 93. 1 Introduction; 94. 1.1 The Statement of the Problem; 95. 1.2 The Data; 96. 1.3 The Methodology; 97. 1.4 The Structure of the Paper; 98. 2 Semantic and Syntactic Information in the ECD; 99. 2.1 Semantic Zone; 100. 2.2 Syntactic Zone; 101. 3 Emotion Lexemes in German; 102. 3.1 Semantics of Emotion Lexemes in German; 103. 3.2 Government Patterns of Emotion Lexemes in German; 104. 3.3 Restricted Lexical Co-occurrence of Emotion Lexemes in German; 105. 4 Towards a More Efficient Representation of Lexicographic Information; 106. 4.1 Discussion of Lexical Co-occurrence/Meaning Correlations; 107. 4.2 Implementing Syntactic Inheritance in an ecd; 108. 4.3 Implementing Lexical Inheritance Principle in an ecd; 109. 4.4 Full vs. Compressed Lexical Entries: angst, hoffnung, wut; 110. 4.5 The Lexical Entry of gefuhl: the Generic Lexeme of the Semantic Field of Emotions; 111. 5 Conclusions; 112. Some Procedural Problems in the Implementation of Lexical Functions for Text Generation (by Iordanskaja, Lidija); 113. 1 Introduction; 114. 2 Use of Lexical Functions in the lfs/rts Systems; 115. 3 General Principles behind the Implementation of Lexical Functions; 116. 4 Levels of Transition Where Lexical Functions Are Used; 117. 4.1 SemR => DSyntR Transition; 118. 4.2 DSyntR => SSyntR Transition; 119. 5 Encoding the Values of Lexical Functions in the Lexicon; 120. 6 Implementation of Lexical Function Paraphrasing; 121. 7 L Paraphrasing Rules Used in the lfs/rts Systems; 122. 7.1 Six cases of RedSemR => DSyntR Transition Rules Using lfs; 123. 7.2 Criteria for Choosing Among Transition Rules; 124. 8 Conclusion; 125. Generating Cohesive Text Using Lexical Functions (by Lee, Woongjae); 126. 1 Introduction; 127. 2 The Generation Process; 128. 3 The Choice of Referring Expressions; 129. 4 Generating Appropriate Collocations; 130. 5 The Lexical Database; 131. 6 Summary; 132. ruslo: An Automatic System for Derivation in Russian (by Percova, Natal'ja); 133. 1 Introduction: Automatic System for Russian Derivation; 134. 2 Linguistic Information in ruslo; 135. 2.1 Formal Information; 136. 2.2 Semantic Information; 137. 3 Material for Further Research: Xlebnikov's Neologisms; 138. Bibliography; 139. Subject Index; 140. Name Index

Product Details

  • ISBN13: 9789027230348
  • Format: Hardback
  • Number Of Pages: 376
  • ID: 9789027230348
  • weight: 600
  • ISBN10: 902723034X

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