Measuring and Managing Liquidity Risk (Wiley Finance Series)

Measuring and Managing Liquidity Risk (Wiley Finance Series)

By: Antonio Castagna (author), Francesco Fede (author)Hardback

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Description

A fully up-to-date, cutting-edge guide to the measurement and management of liquidity risk Written for front and middle office risk management and quantitative practitioners, this book provides the ground-level knowledge, tools, and techniques for effective liquidity risk management. Highly practical, though thoroughly grounded in theory, the book begins with the basics of liquidity risks and, using examples pulled from the recent financial crisis, how they manifest themselves in financial institutions. The book then goes on to look at tools which can be used to measure liquidity risk, discussing risk monitoring and the different models used, notably financial variables models, credit variables models, and behavioural variables models, and then at managing these risks. As well as looking at the tools necessary for effective measurement and management, the book also looks at and discusses current regulation and the implication of new Basel regulations on management procedures and tools.

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About Author

Antonio Castagna (Milan, Italy), is Partner of Consulting Firm Iason ltd. F.F: Head of Structured Products at Banca Profilo, Milan, Italy. Prior to this, he was head of FX Volatility trading at Banca IMI and has also held positions as Interest Rate options trader, FX options Trader in Milan and Financial Risk Analyst at IMI Luxemburg. Antonio holds chartered accountant and certified public accountant qualifications and is very active on the conference circuit and teaching at Masters level on FX topics. He graduated in Finance from LUISS University, Rome, in 1995 with a thesis on American options and the numerical procedures for their valuation. Francesco Fede (Milan, Italy), Head of Treasury at Banca IMI, Milan, Italy, one of the major European investment banks, and is also involved in redefining the liquidity policy for the IntesaSanPaolo Bank, the parent company of Banca IMI and the second largest Italian bank. Previously, he has help positions as Head of the Financial Analysis Unit in IMI Banca Luxembourg, and SVP Treasury and SVP structured Bond Dealer, also at Banca IMI.

Contents

Preface xiii About the authors xvii Abbreviations and acronyms xix PART I LIQUIDITY AND BANKING ACTIVITY 1 1 Banks as lemons? 3 1.1 Introduction 3 1.2 The first wave 4 1.3 Banks as lemons? 7 1.4 The response 9 1.5 The second wave 13 1.6 Conclusion 15 2 A journey into liquidity 17 2.1 Introduction 17 2.2 Central bank liquidity 18 2.3 Funding liquidity 19 2.4 Market liquidity 22 2.5 The virtuous circle 24 2.6 The vicious circle 24 2.8 The role of the central bank, supervision and regulation 28 2.9 Conclusions 31 3 Too big to fail 33 3.1 Introduction 33 3.2 When giants fall 34 3.3 A hard lesson 36 3.4 Closer supervision 37 3.5 G-SIFI regulations 39 3.6 The next steps 41 3.7 Conclusion 44 4 The new framework 47 4.1 Introduction 47 4.2 Some basic liquidity risk measures 48 4.3 The first mover 50 4.4 Basel III: The new framework for liquidity risk measurement and monitoring 53 4.4.1 The liquidity coverage ratio 55 4.5 Inside the liquidity coverage ratio 63 4.6 The other metrics 66 4.7 Intraday liquidity risk 69 4.8 Beyond the ratios 72 4.9 Conclusion 74 5 Know thyself! 75 5.1 Introduction 75 5.2 Some changes on the liabilities side 75 5.3 The role of leverage 79 5.4 The originate-to-distribute business model 82 5.5 The liquidity framework 84 5.6 Stress-testing and contingency funding plan 89 5.7 The CEBS identity card 95 5.8 Conclusions 97 5.9 Appendix: The CEBS Identity Card Annex (CEBS) 98 PART II TOOLS TO MANAGE LIQUIDITY RISK 109 6 Monitoring liquidity 111 6.1 A taxonomy of cash flows 111 6.2 Liquidity options 114 6.3 Liquidity risk 115 6.4 Quantitative liquidity risk measures 118 6.4.1 The term structure of expected cash flows and the term structure of expected cumulated cash flows 119 6.4.2 Liquidity generation capacity 123 6.4.3 The term structure of available assets 127 6.5 The term structure of expected liquidity 134 6.6 Cash flows at risk and the term structure of liquidity at risk 135 7 Liquidity buffer and term structure of funding 143 7.1 Introduction 143 7.2 Liquidity buffer and counterbalancing capacity 143 7.3 The first cause of the need for a liquidity buffer: Maturity mismatch 145 7.3.1 Some or all stressed scenarios do not occur 149 7.3.2 The cost of the liquidity buffer for maturity mismatch 152 7.3.3 Liquidity buffer costs when stressed scenarios do not occur 158 7.3.4 A more general formula for liquidity buffer costs 163 7.4 Funding assets with several liabilities 168 7.5 Actual scenarios severer than predicted 169 7.6 The term structure of available funding and the liquidity buffer 171 7.6.1 The term structure of forward cumulated funding and how to use it 175 7.7 Non-maturing liabilities 179 7.7.1 Pricing of NML and cost of the liquidity buffer 182 7.8 The second cause of the liquidity buffer: Collateral margining 186 7.8.1 A method to set the liquidity buffer for derivative collateral 186 7.8.2 The cost of the liquidity buffer for derivative collateral 188 7.9 The third cause of the liquidity buffer: Off-balance-sheet commitments 192 7.10 Basel III regulation and liquidity buffer 194 8 Models for market risk factors 199 8.1 Introduction 199 8.2 Stock prices and FX rates 199 8.3 Interest rate models 201 8.3.1 One-factor models for the zero rate 201 8.3.2 Vasicek model 202 8.3.3 The CIR model 202 8.3.4 The CIRpp model 209 8.3.5 The basic affine jump diffusion model 211 8.3.6 Numerical implementations 212 8.3.7 Discrete version of the CIR model 212 8.3.8 Monte Carlo methods 214 8.3.9 Libor market model 215 8.4 Default probabilities and credit spreads 219 8.4.1 Structural models 219 8.4.2 Reduced models 221 8.4.3 Credit spreads 223 8.5 Expected and minimum liquidity generation capacity of available bonds 224 8.5.1 Value of the position in a defaultable coupon bond 225 8.5.2 Expected value of the position in a coupon bond 226 8.5.3 Haircut modelling 227 8.5.4 Future value of a bond portfolio 228 8.5.5 Calculating the quantile: a (Delta - Tua) approximation of the portfolio 228 8.5.6 Estimation of the CIR++ model for interest rates 231 8.5.7 Estimation of the CIR++ model for default intensities 233 8.5.8 Future liquidity from a single bond 239 8.5.9 Future liquidity from more bonds 240 8.6 Fair haircut for repo transactions and collateralized loans 247 8.7 Adjustments to the value of illiquid bonds 256 8.7.1 Liquid equivalent adjustment 258 8.7.2 Price volatility adjustment 261 8.A Expectation value of the bond with selling probability and spread 270 9 Behavioural models 277 9.1 Introduction 277 9.2 Prepayment modelling 277 9.2.1 Common approaches to modelling prepayments 277 9.2.2 Hedging with an empirical model 278 9.2.3 Effective hedging strategies of prepayment risk 285 9.2.4 Conclusions on prepayment models 288 9.2.5 Modelling prepayment decisions 288 9.2.6 Modelling the losses upon prepayment 290 9.2.7 Analytical approximation for ELoP1 296 9.2.8 Valuing the ELoP using a VaR approach 299 9.2.9 Extension to double rational prepayment 303 9.2.10 Total prepayment cost 305 9.2.11 Expected cash flows 306 9.2.12 Mortgage pricing including prepayment costs 308 9.3 Sight deposit and non-maturing liability modelling 316 9.3.1 Modelling approaches 317 9.3.2 The stochastic factor approach 319 9.3.3 Economic evaluation and risk management of deposits 324 9.3.4 Inclusion of bank runs 334 9.4 Credit line modelling 337 9.4.1 Measures to monitor usage of credit lines 339 9.4.2 Modelling withdrawal intensity 340 9.4.3 Liquidity management of credit lines 341 9.4.4 Pricing of credit lines 360 9.4.5 Commitment fee 362 9.4.6 Adding the probability of default 364 9.4.7 Spread option 365 9.4.8 Incremental pricing 368 PART III PRICING LIQUIDITY RISK 383 10 The links between credit risk and funding cost 385 10.1 Introduction 385 10.2 The axiom 385 10.3 Cash flow fair values and discounting 386 10.4 Critique of debit value adjustment 389 10.4.1 Single-period case 389 10.4.2 Multi-period case 391 10.4.3 DVA as a funding benefit 394 10.5 DVA for derivative contracts 397 10.6 Extension to positive recovery and liquidity risk 402 10.7 Dynamic replication of DVA 404 10.7.1 The gain process 404 10.7.2 Dynamic replication of a defaultable claim 405 10.7.3 Objections to the statement "no long position in a bank's own bonds is possible" 409 10.7.4 DVA replication by the funding benefit 410 10.7.5 DVA replication and bank s franchise 415 10.8 Recapitulation of results 419 10.9 Accounting standard and DVA 419 10.10 Distinction between price and value 421 11 Cost of liquidity and fund transfer pricing 425 11.1 Introduction 425 11.2 Principles of transfer pricing 425 11.2.1 Balance sheet 425 11.2.2 Bank s profits and losses 426 11.3 Funding and banking activity 431 11.4 Building a funding curve 432 11.5 Including the funding cost in loan pricing 446 11.5.1 Pricing of a fixed rate bullet loan 450 11.6 Monitoring funding costs and risk control of refunding risk 452 11.7 Funding costs and asset/liability management 456 11.8 Internal fund transfer pricing system 457 11.8.1 Multiple curves 459 11.8.2 Single curve 461 11.8.3 Implementation of funding policies 465 11.9 Best practices and regulation 468 12 Liquidity risk and the cost of funding in derivative contracts 473 12.1 Pricing of derivative contracts under collateral agreements 473 12.1.1 Pricing in a simple discrete setting 475 12.1.2 The replicating portfolio in continuous time 480 12.1.3 Pricing with a funding rate different from the investment rate 483 12.1.4 Funding rate different from investment rate and repo rate 489 12.1.5 Interest rate derivatives 491 12.2 Pricing of collateralized derivative contracts when more than one currency is involved 499 12.2.1 Contracts collateralized in a currency other than the payoff currency 499 12.2.2 FX derivatives 505 12.2.3 Interest rate derivatives 511 12.2.4 Cross-currency swaps 514 12.3 Valuation of non-collateralized interest rate swaps including funding costs 518 12.3.1 The basic setup 518 12.3.2 Hedging swap exposures and cash flows 519 12.3.3 Funding spread modelling 521 12.3.4 Strategy 1: Funding all cash flows at inception 522 12.3.5 Strategy 2: Funding negative cash flows when they occur 524 12.3.6 Including counterparty credit risk 528 12.3.7 Practical examples 531 13 A sort of conclusion: towards a new treasury? 539 13.1 Introduction 539 13.2 Organization of the treasury and the dealing room 539 13.3 Banking vs trading book 542 13.3.1 Collateralization 542 13.3.2 Links amongst risks 543 13.3.3 Production costs 545 References 547 Index 553

Product Details

  • publication date: 28/06/2013
  • ISBN13: 9781119990246
  • Format: Hardback
  • Number Of Pages: 598
  • ID: 9781119990246
  • weight: 1182
  • ISBN10: 1119990246

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  • Saver Delivery: Yes
  • 1st Class Delivery: Yes
  • Courier Delivery: Yes
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