Philosophy Comes to Dinner: Arguments About the Ethics of Eating

Philosophy Comes to Dinner: Arguments About the Ethics of Eating

By: Terence Cuneo (editor), Matthew C. Halteman (editor), Andrew Chignell (editor)Paperback

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Description

Everyone is talking about food. Chefs are celebrities. "Locavore" and "freegan" have earned spots in the dictionary. Popular books and films about food production and consumption are exposing the unintended consequences of the standard American diet. Questions about the principles and values that ought to guide decisions about dinner have become urgent for moral, ecological, and health-related reasons. In Philosophy Comes to Dinner, twelve philosophers-some leading voices, some inspiring new ones-join the conversation, and consider issues ranging from the sustainability of modern agriculture, to consumer complicity in animal exploitation, to the pros and cons of alternative diets.

About Author

Andrew Chignell is Associate Professor at Cornell University. His research focuses on Kant and other early modern philosophers. Topically he has worked on epistemology, aesthetics, and philosophy of religion. He is the co-instructor of "The Ethics of Eating" Massive Online Open Course on Edx.org and a contributor to the Oxford Handbook of Food Ethics. Terence Cuneo is the Marsh Professor of Intellectual and Moral Philosophy at the University of Vermont. He is the author of The Normative Web (2007), Speech and Morality (2014), and Ritualized Faith (2016). Matthew C. Halteman is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Calvin College and a fellow in the Oxford Centre for Animal Ethics. He is the author of Compassionate Eating as Care of Creation (2008).

Contents

0. Matthew C. Halteman, Terence Cuneo, Andrew Chignell, "Introduction". I. Dietary Ideals. 1. Terence Cuneo, "Conscientious Omnivorism". 2. Christina Van Dyke, "Manly Meat and Gendered Eating: Correcting Imbalance and Seeking Virtue". 3. Benjamin J. Bruxvoort Lipscomb, "'Eat Responsibly:' Agrarianism and Meat". 4. Tristram McPherson, "Why I Am a Vegan (and You Should Be One Too)". 5. Dan Hooley and Nathan Nobis, "A Moral Argument for Veganism". 6. Tyler Doggett and Andy Egan, "Non-Ideal Food Choices". 7. Matthew C. Halteman and Megan Halteman Zwart, "Philosophy as Therapy for Recovering (Unrestrained) Omnivores". II. Puzzling Questions. 8. Ted A.Warfield, "Eating Dead Animals: Meat Eating, Meat Purchasing, and Proving Too Much". 9. Mark Budolfson, "Consumer Ethics, Harm Footprints, and the Empirical Dimensions of Food Choices". 10. Andrew Chignell, "Can We Really Vote with Our Forks? Opportunism and the Threshold Chicken". 11. Adrienne M. Martin, "Factory Farming and Consumer Complicity". 12. Elizabeth Harman, "Eating Meat as a Morally Permissible Moral Mistake". 13. Anne Barnhill, "Does Locavorism Keep It Too Simple?". 14. David M. Kaplan, "What's Wrong with Artificial Ingredients?". 15. Jeff McMahan, "The Moral Problem of Predation"

Product Details

  • ISBN13: 9780415806831
  • Format: Paperback
  • Number Of Pages: 310
  • ID: 9780415806831
  • weight: 431
  • ISBN10: 0415806836

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