Photoperiodism: The Biological Calendar

Photoperiodism: The Biological Calendar

By: David E. Somers (editor), Randy J. Nelson (editor), David L. Denlinger (editor)Hardback

Up to 2 WeeksUsually despatched within 2 weeks

Description

This book examines the role of photoperiod (day length) in timing seasonal adaptations in plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates, and is the first to present such a broad perspective on the subject in quite some time. The current literature is distinctly separated among researchers working with these different taxa, resulting in inefficiency and redundancies. The field is poised to make rapid progress in the understanding of seasonal clocks at all levels of analysis, and Photoperiodism brings together experts working in disparate areas to stimulate conversation among investigators from all related disciplines. At the end of the book, the three editors analyze common themes in photoperiod time measurement across taxa, as well as common and dissimilar approaches to the study of photoperiodism, and propose future directions in research on photoperiodic time measurement.

About Author

Randy J. Nelson is a Distinguished University Professor of Social and Behavioral Sciences at Ohio State University. David L. Denlinger is a Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Entomology at the Ohio State University. David E. Somers is an Associate Professor in the Department of Plant Cellular and Molecular Biology at the Ohio State University.

Contents

PART I. PHOTOPERIODISM IN PLANTS AND FUNGI; BRIEF OVERVIEW; PART II. PHOTOPERIODISM IN INVERTEBRATES; BRIEF OVERVIEW; PART III. PHOTOPERIODISM IN VERTEBRATES; BRIEF OVERVIEW

Product Details

  • ISBN13: 9780195335903
  • Format: Hardback
  • Number Of Pages: 600
  • ID: 9780195335903
  • weight: 953
  • ISBN10: 0195335902

Delivery Information

  • Saver Delivery: Yes
  • 1st Class Delivery: Yes
  • Courier Delivery: Yes
  • Store Delivery: Yes

Prices are for internet purchases only. Prices and availability in WHSmith Stores may vary significantly

Close