Relational Database Writings

Relational Database Writings

By: C. J. Date (editor)Paperback

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Description

This book is the fourth in a series. Like its predecessors, the book consists of a collection of papers on various aspects of relational technology. A special feature of the book is Part I, Theory Is Practical! which consists of the first 25 installments of Chris Date's popular column "According to Date" from Database Programming & Design magazine. Other important chapters include four collaborative efforts (three with David McGoveran and one with Hugh Darwen) describing the results of some significant new research into database design, integrity, view updating, and a proposal---"The Third Manifesto"---for an object-oriented/relational rapprochement. The book also includes the text of a debate between Chris Date and E.F. Codd on the handling of missing information, and an interview that Chris Date gave to Data Base Newsletter in 1994. 0201824590B04062001

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About Author

C. J. Date is an independent author, lecturer, researcher, and consultant specializing in relational database systems, a field he helped pioneer. Among other projects, he was involved in technical planning for the IBM products SQL/DS and DB2. He is best known for his books, in particular, An Introduction to Database Systems (7th edition, Addison-Wesley, 2000), the standard text in the field, which has sold well over half a million copies worldwide. Mr. Date is widely acknowledged for his ability to explain complex technical material in a clear and understandable fashion. 0201824590AB04062001

Contents

I. THEORY IS PRACTICAL. Introduction. 1. Theory is Practical. 2. The Importance of Closure. 3. What's in a Name. 4. Why Three-Valued Logic is a Mistake. 5. Nothing in Excess. 6. Answers to Puzzle Corner Problems (Installments 1-5). 7. Tables with No Columns. 8. Empty Bags and Identity Crises. 9. The Power of the Keys. 10. Expression Transformation (Part 1 of 3). 11. A Matter of Integrity (Part 2 of 3). 12. A Matter of Integrity (Part 3 of 3). 13. Toil and Trouble. 14. Answers to Puzzle Corner Problems (Installments 13-17). 15. More on DEE and DUM. 16. Divide---and Conquer. 17. Relational Comparison. 18. Domains, Relations, and Data Types (Part 1 of 2). 19. Domains, Relations, and Data Types (Part 2 of 2). 20. Answers to Puzzle Corner Problems (Installments 19-23). 21. Many Happy Returns! II. RELATIONAL DATABASE MANAGEMENT. An Overview Of INGRES and QUEL. 1. Abstract. 2. Comments on Republication. 3. Background. 4. Data Definition. 5. Data Manipulation: Retrieval Operations. 6. Data Manipulations: Update Operations. 7. Views. 8. Embedded QUEL. The Primacy Of Primary Keys: An Investigation. 1. Abstract. 2. Comments of Republication. 3. Introduction. 4. Keys in Relational Model. 5. Arguments in Defense of the PK: AK Distinction. 6. Relations with Multiple Candidate Keys. 7. The Invoices-and-Shipments example. 8. One Primary Key Per Entry Type. 9. The Applicants-and-Employees Example. 10. Conclusion. A Normalization Problem. 1. Abstract. 2. Comments on Republication. 3. Problem Statement. 4. Definitions of 3NF and BCNF. 5. Problem Solving. 6. The Five Proposed Solutions. 7. Declaring Integrity Constraints. A New Database Design Principle. 1. Abstract. 2. Comments on Republication. 3. Introduction. 4. The Loves-Hates Example. 5. The Employee Example. 6. Integrity Constraints. 7. The Question of Meaning. 8. Tables with Overlapping Meanings. 9. The Examples Revisited. 10. An Important Clarification. 11. Concluding Remarks. Updating Union, Intersection, And Difference Views. 1. Abstract. 2. Comments on Republication. 3. Introduction. 4. Integrity Constraints. 5. Table Predicates. 6. Further Principles. 7. Updating Unions. 8. Updating Intersections and Differences. 9. Concluding Remarks. Updating Joins And Other Views Abstract. 1. Comments on Republication. 2. Introduction. 3. Preliminaries. 4. The Supplier-and-Parts Database. 5. Updating Restrictions. 6. Updating Projections. 7. Updating Extensions. 8. Updating Joins. 9. Concluding Remarks. The Extended Relational Model RM/T Abstract. 1. Comments on Republication. 2. Introduction. 3. An Overview of RM/T. 4. Database Design with RM/T. 5. Comparison with E/R Model. 6. Summary. The Third Manifesto Abstract. 1. Comments on Republication. 2. Introduction. 3. Back to the Future. 4. RM Prescriptions. 5. RM Proscriptions. 6. OOPrescriptions. 7. OO Proscriptions. 8. Very Strong Suggestions. 9. OO Very Strong Suggestions. 10. Summary. Much Ado About Nothing. 1. Abstract. 2. Comments on Republication. 3. Introduction. 4. Codd's Commentary. 5. Date's Rebuttal I. 6. Date's Rebuttal II. 7. Date's Rebuttal III. 8. Date's Rebuttal IV. 9. Rebutting the Rebuttals. A Note On The Logical Operators Of SQL. 1. Abstract. 2. Comments on Republication. 3. Introduction. 4. Some Further Preliminaries. 5. Monadic Operators Supported "Directly". 6. Monadic Operators Supported "Indirectly". 7. Dynadic Operators. 8. Dynadic Operators Revisted. 9. Concluding Remarks. IV. RELATIONAL VS. NONRELATIONAL SYSTEMS. Essentiality. 1. Abstract. 2. Comments on Republication. 3. Introduction. 4. A Hierarchic Database. 5. Querying the Hierarchic Database. 6. Relational vs. Nonrelational Databases. 7. Essential vs. Inessential Ordering. 8. Concluding Remarks. An Inverted List System: Datacom/DB. 1. Abstract. 2. Comments on Republication. 3. Background. 4. The Inverted List Model. 5. An Overview of DATACOM/DB. 6. Data Definition. 7. Data Manipulation. 8. The Compound Boolean Selection Feature. A Hierarchic System: IMS. 1. Abstract. 2. Comments on Republication. 3. Background. 4. The Network Model. 5. An Overview of IDMS. 6. Data Definition. 7. Data Manipulation. 8. Storage Structure. 9. Logical Databases. 10. Secondary Indexes. 11. Concluding Remarks. A Network System: IDMS. 1. Abstract. 2. Comments on Republication. 3. Background. 4. The Network Model. 5. An Overview of IDMS. 6. Data Definition. 7. Data Manipulation. 8. Storage Structure. 9. The Logical Record Facility. 10. The Automatic System Facility. 11. Concluding Remarks. Frontend Subsystems. 1. Abstract. 2. Comments on Republication. 3. Introduction. 4. Data Access. 5. Data Presentation. 6. Application Generation. Afterword. 1. Comments on Republication. 2. Relational vs. OO Systems. 3. Mapping Object Classes to the Relational Model. 4. Tables within Tables. 5. Views and Object Classes. 6. Encapsulation. 7. Inheritance and Type Hierarchies. 8. Database Design. 9. Business Rules. 10. OO Systems. 11. Further Developments in Data Management. 0201824590T04062001

Product Details

  • publication date: 16/01/1995
  • ISBN13: 9780201824599
  • Format: Paperback
  • Year: 1991-1994
  • Number Of Pages: 542
  • ID: 9780201824599
  • weight: 1577
  • ISBN10: 0201824590

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