Self-Assembly and Nanotechnology Systems: Design, Characterization, and Applications

Self-Assembly and Nanotechnology Systems: Design, Characterization, and Applications

By: Yoon S. Lee (author)Hardback

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Description

A fundamental resource for understanding and developing effective self-assembly and nanotechnology systems Systematically integrating self-assembly, nanoassembly, and nanofabrication into one easy-to-use source, Self-Assembly and Nanotechnology Systems effectively helps students, professors, and researchers comprehend and develop applicable techniques for use in the field. Through case studies, countless examples, clear questions, and general applications, this book provides experiment-oriented techniques for designing, applying, and characterizing self-assembly and nanotechnology systems. Self-Assembly and Nanotechnology Systems includes: * Techniques for identifying assembly building units * Practical assembly methods to focus on when developing nanomaterials, nanostructures, nanoproperties, nanofabricated systems, and nanomechanics * Algorithmic diagrams in each chapter for a general overview * Schematics designed to link assembly principles with actual systems * Hands-on lab activities This informative reference also analyzes the diverse origins and structures of assembly building units, segmental analysis, and selection of assembly principles, methods, characterization techniques, and predictive models. Complementing the author's previous conceptually based book on this topic, Self-Assembly and Nanotechnology Systems is a practical guide that grants practitioners not only the skills to properly analyze assembly building units but also how to work with applications to exercise and develop their knowledge of this rapidly advancing scientific field.

About Author

YOON S. LEE, PhD, is a Scientific Information Analyst at Chemical Abstracts Service. He earned his PhD from Seoul National University in South Korea and performed postdoctoral research at The Ohio State University. He is the author of Self-Assembly and Nanotechnology: A Force Balance Approach.

Contents

PREFACE xvii ABBREVIATIONS xix PART I BUILDING UNITS 1 1 Self-Assembly Systems 3 1.1. Self-Assembly / 4 1.2. Identification of Building Units / 6 1.2.1. What Is a Self-Assembly Building Unit? / 6 1.2.2. Segmental Analysis / 7 1.2.2.1. Three Fundamental Segments / 7 1.2.2.2. Two Additional Segments / 11 1.3. Implication of Building Unit Structures for Self-Assemblies / 15 1.4. General Assembly Diagram / 17 1.5. Collection of Building Units / 23 1.5.1. Basic Building Units / 23 1.5.2. Directionally Assembling Building Units / 26 1.5.3. Asymmetrically Packing Building Units / 28 1.5.4. Functional Building Units / 28 1.6. Concluding Remarks / 30 References / 31 2 Nanotechnology Systems 33 2.1. Nanoassembly / 35 2.2. Identification of Building Units / 37 2.2.1. What Is a Nanoassembly Building Unit? / 37 2.2.2. Fabrication Building Units / 38 2.2.3. Reactive Building Units / 40 2.3. Nanoelements / 41 2.4. Implication of Building Unit Structures for Nanoassemblies / 42 2.5. General Assembly Diagram / 45 2.6. Self-Assembly, Nanoassembly, and Nanofabrication / 51 2.7. Collection of Building Units / 54 2.7.1. Ligand-Protected Nanoparticles / 54 2.7.2. Functional Surfaces / 56 2.7.3. Reactive Precursors / 57 2.7.4. Substrates / 57 2.7.5. Reducing Agents / 58 2.8. Concluding Remarks / 58 References / 60 PART II DESIGN 61 3 Identification of Self-Assembly Capability 63 3.1. Assembly Issue / 63 3.2. General Overview / 64 3.3. Assembly Principles / 65 3.3.1. Molecular Self-Assembly / 65 3.3.1.1. Ionic Surfactants / 69 3.3.1.2. Nonionic Surfactants / 70 3.3.2. Colloidal Self-Assembly / 71 3.3.2.1. Colloids with Different Origins / 74 3.3.2.2. Colloids with Different Sizes / 75 3.3.3. Directionally Assembling Systems / 77 3.3.4. Self-Assembly at Surfaces / 81 3.3.4.1. Hydrophobic Surfaces / 82 3.3.4.2. Hydrophilic Surfaces / 87 3.4. Collection of Primary Self-Assembled Aggregates / 89 3.5. Summary / 89 References / 91 4 Identification of Multi-Step Self-Assemblies 93 4.1. Assembly Issue / 93 4.2. General Overview / 94 4.3. Assembly Principles / 96 4.3.1. Molecular Self-Assembly of Surfactants / 97 4.3.2. Colloidal Self-Assembly / 102 4.4. Collection of Higher-Order Self-Assembled Aggregates / 105 4.5. Collection of Self-Assembled Aggregates within Biological Systems / 107 4.6. Summary / 108 References / 110 5 Control of the Structures of Self-Assembled Aggregates 111 5.1. Assembly Issue / 111 5.2. General Overview / 112 5.2.1. Primary Self-Assembled Aggregates / 112 5.2.2. Higher-Order Self-Assembled Aggregates / 113 5.3. Assembly Principles / 115 5.3.1. Primary Self-Assembled Aggregates / 115 5.3.1.1. Molecular Systems I / 117 5.3.1.2. Molecular Systems II / 121 5.3.1.3. Colloidal Systems / 125 5.3.2. Higher-Order Self-Assembled Aggregates / 130 5.3.2.1. Molecular Systems / 132 5.3.2.2. Colloidal Systems / 134 5.4. Collection of the Structures of Self-Assembled Aggregates / 136 5.4.1. Primary Self-Assembled Aggregates / 136 5.4.2. Higher-Order Self-Assembled Aggregates / 137 5.5. Summary / 139 References / 140 6 Hierarchy and Chirality of Self-Assembled Aggregates 141 6.1. Assembly Issue / 141 6.2. General Overview / 142 6.3. Assembly Principles / 143 6.3.1. Molecular Systems / 145 6.3.2. Surface Systems / 148 6.4. Collection of Hierarchy within Self-Assembled Aggregates / 156 6.5. Collection of Chirality Expressed by Self-Assembled Aggregates / 157 6.6. Summary / 159 References / 160 7 Assembly with Multiple Building Units 161 7.1. Assembly Issue / 161 7.2. General Overview / 163 7.3. Assembly Principles / 164 7.3.1. Analysis of Building Units / 164 7.3.2. Assembly of Nanoassembled Systems / 168 7.3.2.1. Homogeneous Assemblies / 168 7.3.2.2. Sequential Assemblies / 172 7.3.2.3. Hierarchical Assemblies / 177 7.3.3. General Assembly Trends / 180 7.3.3.1. Homogeneous Assemblies / 180 7.3.3.2. Heterogeneous Assemblies I / 182 7.3.3.3. Surface Assemblies / 183 7.3.3.4. Heterogeneous Assemblies II / 184 7.4. Collection of Nanoassembled Systems I / 185 7.5. Collection of Nanoporous Solids / 186 7.5.1. Synthetic Zeolites / 187 7.5.2. Metal-Organic Frameworks / 189 7.6. Summary / 189 References / 189 8 Directed and Forced Assemblies 191 8.1. Assembly Issue / 191 8.2. General Overview / 192 8.3. Assembly Principles / 196 8.3.1. Analysis of Building Units / 196 8.3.2. Assembly under External Forces / 199 8.3.2.1. Forced Assemblies / 199 8.3.2.2. Directed/Forced Assemblies / 204 8.3.2.3. Directed Assemblies / 208 8.3.3. General Assembly Trends under External Forces / 213 8.3.3.1. Forced Assemblies / 214 8.3.3.2. Directed/Forced Assemblies / 215 8.3.3.3. Directed Assemblies / 216 8.3.3.4. Window of Critical External Forces / 218 8.4. Techniques for Directed and Forced Assemblies / 219 8.5. Surface-Induced Directed and Forced Assemblies / 220 8.6. Collection of Nanoassembled Systems II / 220 8.7. Summary / 222 References / 222 PART III APPLICATIONS 225 9 External Signal Responsive Nanomaterials 227 9.1. Nanoissue / 227 9.2. General Overview / 228 9.3. Assembly Principles / 231 9.3.1. External Signal Responsive Molecular Assemblies / 231 9.3.1.1. Light-Responsive Assemblies / 232 9.3.1.2. Catalytic Reaction Responsive Assemblies / 235 9.3.1.3. Electrochemical-Responsive Assemblies / 237 9.3.1.4. Solution pH Responsive Assemblies / 239 9.3.2. External Signal Responsive Colloidal Assemblies / 242 9.3.2.1. Thermo-Responsive Assemblies / 244 9.3.2.2. Solution pH Responsive Assemblies / 245 9.3.2.3. Magnetic Field Responsive Assemblies / 247 9.4. Collection of External Signal Responsive Assembly Systems / 250 9.5. From Assembly Systems to Nanomaterials / 250 9.6. Collection of External Signal Responsive Nanomaterials / 253 9.7. Summary / 254 References / 255 10 Nanomaterials with Intrinsic Functionalities 257 10.1. Nanoissue / 257 10.2. General Overview / 258 10.3. Assembly Principles / 261 10.3.1. Molecular Assembled Systems / 263 10.3.2. Colloidal Assembled Systems / 267 10.4. From Assembled Systems to Nanomaterials / 270 10.5. Collection of Nanomaterials with Intrinsic Functionalities / 270 10.6. Summary / 272 References / 272 11 Nanostructures: Designed to Perform 275 11.1. Nanoissue / 275 11.2. General Overview / 276 11.3. Assembly Principles / 277 11.3.1. Analysis of Building Units / 277 11.3.2. Nanostructure Assemblies / 281 11.3.3. Nanopore-Based Nanostructures / 283 11.3.4. Nanoparticle-Based Nanostructures / 287 11.3.5. Nanofilm-Based Nanostructures / 292 11.3.6. General Trends / 297 11.4. Collection of Common Nanostructure Names / 298 11.5. Collection of Nanostructures and Their Applications / 298 11.6. Summary / 301 References / 303 12 Nanoproperties: Controlled to Express 305 12.1. Nanoissue / 305 12.2. General Overview / 306 12.3. Assembly Principles / 307 12.3.1. Analysis of Building Units / 307 12.3.2. Different Types of Nanoproperties / 313 12.3.3. Assemblies to Obtain Nanoproperties / 316 12.3.4. Individual Types of Nanoproperties / 318 12.3.5. Collective Types of Nanoproperties / 321 12.3.6. Cooperative Types of Nanoproperties / 324 12.3.7. General Trends / 327 12.4. Collection of Nanoproperties and Their Applications / 328 12.5. Summary / 329 References / 331 13 Nanofabricated Systems: Combined to Function 333 13.1. Nanoissue / 333 13.2. General Overview / 334 13.3. Fabrication Principles / 335 13.3.1. Analysis of Building Units / 336 13.3.2. Nanofabrication / 340 13.3.3. Bottom-Up Approach / 342 13.3.4. Top-Down Approach / 345 13.3.5. Bottom-Up/Top-Down Hybrid Approach / 347 13.3.6. General Trends / 350 13.4. Collection of Top-Down Techniques / 352 13.5. Collection of Top-Down Bulk Materials and Functionalizing Agents / 352 13.6. Collection of Nanofabricated Systems and Their Applications / 353 13.7. Summary / 353 References / 356 14 Nanomechanical Movements: Combined to Operate 359 14.1. Nanoissue / 359 14.2. General Overview / 360 14.3. Fabrication Principles / 361 14.3.1. Element Motions / 361 14.3.2. Working Mechanisms / 362 14.3.3. Analysis of Building Units / 364 14.3.4. Periodic Push Motions / 372 14.3.5. Periodic Pull Motions / 374 14.3.6. Push Pull Motion Cycles / 375 14.3.7. Periodic Push Motions under Guide Motion / 378 14.3.8. Periodic Pull Motions under Guide Motion / 380 14.3.9. Push Pull Motion Cycles under Guide Motion / 383 14.3.10. General Trends / 385 14.4. Collection of Nanomechanical Movements / 386 14.5. Summary / 390 References / 390 PART IV CHARACTERIZATION 393 15 Assembly Forces and Measurements 395 15.1. Intermolecular and Colloidal Forces / 395 15.2. Collection of Intermolecular and Colloidal Forces / 396 15.3. Measurements of Intermolecular and Colloidal Forces / 396 15.3.1. Atomic Force Microscopy / 396 15.3.2. Surface Forces Apparatus / 398 15.4. Collection of Measurement Techniques / 399 15.5. Implications of Building Unit Structures for Characterization / 399 References / 402 16 Assembly Processes and Critical Behaviors 405 16.1. Critical Behaviors as the Characterization Guide of Assembly Processes / 405 16.2. Characterization Principles / 407 16.2.1. Self-Assembly Capability / 407 16.2.1.1. Molecular Systems / 407 16.2.1.2. Colloidal Systems / 409 16.2.2. Multi-Step Self-Assemblies / 410 16.2.2.1. Molecular Systems / 410 16.2.2.2. Colloidal Systems / 412 16.3. Collection of Physical Properties to Measure / 413 16.4. Collection of Critical Assembly Parameters / 414 References / 414 17 Assembled Systems and Structural Properties 417 17.1. Structural Properties for the Characterization of Assembled Systems / 417 17.2. Characterization Principles / 419 17.2.1. Structures of Primary Assembled Systems / 419 17.2.1.1. Molecular Systems / 419 17.2.1.2. Colloidal Systems / 421 17.2.2. Structures of Higher-Order Assembled Systems / 422 17.2.3. Hierarchy and Chirality / 422 17.2.4. Effect of External Forces / 425 17.2.5. Functional Assembled Systems / 426 17.3. Collection of Structural Properties to Measure / 427 References / 427 18 Modeling and Simulations 429 18.1. Assembly Systems Are Big and Multi-Scaled / 429 18.2. Classic Models / 430 18.2.1. Thermodynamic Models / 430 18.2.2. Colloidal Model / 430 18.2.3. Geometrical Model / 431 18.2.4. Elastic Model / 431 18.2.5. Isotherms / 431 18.3. Simulations / 431 18.3.1. Electronic Simulations / 432 18.3.1.1. Density Functional Theory / 432 18.3.1.2. Mean-Field Theory / 433 18.3.2. Atomistic Simulations / 433 18.3.2.1. Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo Methods / 433 18.3.3. Coarse-Grained Simulations / 433 18.3.3.1. Dissipative Particle Dynamics / 434 18.3.3.2. Patchy Particle Model / 434 18.3.3.3. Brownian Dynamics / 435 18.3.3.4. BRAHMS / 435 18.3.3.5. MARTINI / 436 18.3.4. Continuum Simulations / 436 18.3.5. Multi-Scale Simulations / 436 18.4. Concluding Remarks / 437 References / 437 EPILOGUE Informatics for Self-Assembly and Nanotechnology Systems 441 E.1. Background / 441 E.2. Definition and Principle / 443 E.3. Structure / 444 E.4. Development and Benefits / 445 E.5. Challenges / 446 References / 446 INDEX 449

Product Details

  • ISBN13: 9781118087596
  • Format: Hardback
  • Number Of Pages: 480
  • ID: 9781118087596
  • weight: 800
  • ISBN10: 1118087593

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