The Java EE 7 Tutorial: Volume 1 (5th edition)

The Java EE 7 Tutorial: Volume 1 (5th edition)

By: Ian Evans (author), William Markito (author), Kim Haase (author), Ricardo Cervera-Navarro (author), Eric Jendrock (author)Paperback

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Description

The Java EE 7 Tutorial: Volume 1, Fifth Edition, is a task-oriented, example-driven guide to developing enterprise applications for the Java Platform, Enterprise Edition 7 (Java EE 7). Written by members of the Java EE documentation team at Oracle, this book provides new and intermediate Java programmers with a deep understanding of the platform. This guide includes descriptions of platform features and provides instructions for using the latest versions of NetBeans IDE and GlassFish Server Open Source Edition. The book introduces platform basics, including resource creation, resource injection, and packaging. It covers JavaServer Faces, Java Servlets, the Java API for WebSocket, the Java API for JSON Processing (JSON-P), internationalization and localization, Bean Validation, Contexts and Dependency Injection for Java EE (CDI), and web services (JAX-WS and JAX-RS).

About Author

Eric Jendrock leads the Java EE Tutorial team at Oracle and documented Java Servlet technology as well as internationalization and localization. Ricardo Cervera-Navarro documented resource injection, WebSocket, JSON-P, and JAX-RS, and contributed Java Servlet examples. Ian Evans documented Bean Validation, JAX-RS, and JAX-WS. Kim Haase documented JavaServer Faces technology and CDI. William Markito, a former member of the Platform Technology Solutions group at Oracle, created examples for several technologies.

Contents

Preface xxix Part I: Introduction 1 Chapter 1: Overview 3 1.1 Java EE 7 Platform Highlights 4 1.2 Java EE Application Model 5 1.3 Distributed Multitiered Applications 6 1.4 Java EE Containers 13 1.5 Web Services Support 15 1.6 Java EE Application Assembly and Deployment 17 1.7 Development Roles 17 1.8 Java EE 7 APIs 20 1.9 Java EE 7 APIs in the Java Platform, Standard Edition 7 30 1.10 GlassFish Server Tools 33 Chapter 2: Using the Tutorial Examples 35 2.1 Required Software 35 2.2 Starting and Stopping GlassFish Server 39 2.3 Starting the Administration Console. 40 2.4 Starting and Stopping the Java DB Server 40 2.5 Building the Examples 41 2.6 Tutorial Example Directory Structure 41 2.7 Java EE 7 Maven Archetypes in the Tutorial 42 2.8 Getting the Latest Updates to the Tutorial 43 2.9 Debugging Java EE Applications 44 Part II: Platform Basics 47 Chapter 3: Resource Creation 49 3.1 Resources and JNDI Naming 49 3.2 DataSource Objects and Connection Pools 50 3.3 Creating Resources Administratively 51 Chapter 4: Injection 53 4.1 Resource Injection 53 4.2 Dependency Injection 54 4.3 The Main Differences between Resource Injection and Dependency Injection 55 Chapter 5: Packaging 57 5.1 Packaging Applications 57 5.2 Packaging Enterprise Beans 59 5.3 Packaging Web Archives 61 5.4 Packaging Resource Adapter Archives 63 Part III: The Web Tier 65 Chapter 6: Getting Started with Web Applications 67 6.1 Web Applications 68 6.2 Web Application Lifecycle 69 6.3 A Web Module That Uses JavaServer Faces Technology: The hello1 Example 70 6.4 A Web Module That Uses Java Servlet Technology: The hello2 Example 77 6.5 Configuring Web Applications 81 6.6 Further Information about Web Applications 86 Chapter 7: JavaServer Faces Technology 87 7.1 What Is a JavaServer Faces Application? 88 7.2 JavaServer Faces Technology Benefits 89 7.3 A Simple JavaServer Faces Application 91 7.4 User Interface Component Model 92 7.5 Navigation Model 100 7.6 The Lifecycle of a JavaServer Faces Application 103 7.7 Partial Processing and Partial Rendering 110 7.8 Further Information about JavaServer Faces Technology 110 Chapter 8: Introduction to Facelets 111 8.1 What Is Facelets? 112 8.2 The Lifecycle of a Facelets Application 114 8.3 Developing a Simple Facelets Application: The guessnumber-jsf Example Application 115 8.4 Using Facelets Templates 121 8.5 Composite Components 124 8.6 Web Resources 127 8.7 Relocatable Resources 128 8.8 Resource Library Contracts 128 8.9 HTML5-Friendly Markup 132 Chapter 9: Expression Language 141 9.1 Overview of the EL 141 9.2 Immediate and Deferred Evaluation Syntax 142 9.3 Value and Method Expressions 144 9.4 Operations on Collection Objects 151 9.5 Operators 153 9.6 Reserved Words 154 9.7 Examples of EL Expressions 154 9.8 Further Information about the Expression Language 155 Chapter 10: Using JavaServer Faces Technology in Web Pages 157 10.1 Setting Up a Page 158 10.2 Adding Components to a Page Using HTML Tag Library Tags 159 10.3 Using Core Tags 192 Chapter 11: Using Converters, Listeners, and Validators 197 11.1 Using the Standard Converters 198 11.2 Registering Listeners on Components 203 11.3 Using the Standard Validators 207 11.4 Referencing a Managed Bean Method 209 Chapter 12: Developing with JavaServer Faces Technology 213 12.1 Managed Beans in JavaServer Faces Technology 213 12.2 Writing Bean Properties 216 12.3 Writing Managed Bean Methods 226 Chapter 13: Using Ajax with JavaServer Faces Technology 231 13.1 Overview of Ajax 232 13.2 Using Ajax Functionality with JavaServer Faces Technology 233 13.3 Using Ajax with Facelets 233 13.4 Sending an Ajax Request 236 13.5 Monitoring Events on the Client 238 13.6 Handling Errors 238 13.7 Receiving an Ajax Response 239 13.8 Ajax Request Lifecycle 240 13.9 Grouping of Components 240 13.10 Loading JavaScript as a Resource 241 13.11 The ajaxguessnumber Example Application 243 13.12 Further Information about Ajax in JavaServer Faces Technology 247 Chapter 14: Composite Components: Advanced Topics and an Example 249 14.1 Attributes of a Composite Component 249 14.2 Invoking a Managed Bean 251 14.3 Validating Composite Component Values 251 14.4 The compositecomponentexample Example Application 251 Chapter 15: Creating Custom UI Components and Other Custom Objects 257 15.1 Determining Whether You Need a Custom Component or Renderer 259 15.2 Understanding the Image Map Example 262 15.3 Steps for Creating a Custom Component 268 15.4 Creating Custom Component Classes 268 15.5 Delegating Rendering to a Renderer 278 15.6 Implementing an Event Listener 281 15.7 Handling Events for Custom Components 283 15.8 Defining the Custom Component Tag in a Tag Library Descriptor 284 15.9 Using a Custom Component 285 15.10 Creating and Using a Custom Converter 287 15.11 Creating and Using a Custom Validator 292 15.12 Binding Component Values and Instances to Managed Bean Properties 298 15.13 Binding Converters, Listeners, and Validators to Managed Bean Properties 303 Chapter 16: Configuring JavaServer Faces Applications 305 16.1 Using Annotations to Configure Managed Beans 306 16.2 Application Configuration Resource File 307 16.3 Using Faces Flows 311 16.4 Configuring Managed Beans 323 16.5 Registering Application Messages 332 16.6 Using Default Validators 335 16.7 Registering a Custom Validator 336 16.8 Registering a Custom Converter 337 16.9 Configuring Navigation Rules 337 16.10 Registering a Custom Renderer with a Render Kit 340 16.11 Registering a Custom Component 342 16.12 Basic Requirements of a JavaServer Faces Application 343 Chapter 17: Java Servlet Technology 351 17.1 What Is a Servlet? 352 17.2 Servlet Lifecycle 352 17.3 Sharing Information 354 17.4 Creating and Initializing a Servlet 356 17.5 Writing Service Methods 356 17.6 Filtering Requests and Responses 359 17.7 Invoking Other Web Resources 363 17.8 Accessing the Web Context 365 17.9 Maintaining Client State 365 17.10 Finalizing a Servlet 367 17.11 Uploading Files with Java Servlet Technology 370 17.12 Asynchronous Processing 372 17.13 Nonblocking I/O 375 17.14 Protocol Upgrade Processing 378 17.15 The mood Example Application 381 17.16 The fileupload Example Application 383 17.17 The dukeetf Example Application 388 17.18 Further Information about Java Servlet Technology 394 Chapter 18: Java API for WebSocket 395 18.1 Introduction to WebSocket 396 18.2 Creating WebSocket Applications in the Java EE Platform 397 18.3 Programmatic Endpoints 398 18.4 Annotated Endpoints 399 18.5 Sending and Receiving Messages 400 18.6 Maintaining Client State 402 18.7 Using Encoders and Decoders 403 18.8 Path Parameters 406 18.9 Handling Errors 407 18.10 Specifying an Endpoint Configurator Class 407 18.11 The dukeetf2 Example Application 408 18.12 The websocketbot Example Application 413 18.13 Further Information about WebSocket 420 Chapter 19: JSON Processing 421 19.1 Introduction to JSON 421 19.2 JSON Processing in the Java EE Platform 423 19.3 Using the Object Model API 425 19.4 Using the Streaming API 429 19.5 JSON in Java EE RESTful Web Services 431 19.6 The jsonpmodel Example Application 432 19.7 The jsonpstreaming Example Application 434 19.8 Further Information about the Java API for JSON Processing 436 Chapter 20: Internationalizing and Localizing Web Applications 437 20.1 Java Platform Localization Classes 437 20.2 Providing Localized Messages and Labels 438 20.3 Date and Number Formatting 441 20.4 Character Sets and Encodings 442 Part IV: Bean Validation 445 Chapter 21: Introduction to Bean Validation 447 21.1 Using Bean Validation Constraints 447 21.2 Validating Null and Empty Strings 450 21.3 Validating Constructors and Methods 451 21.4 Further Information about Bean Validation 454 Chapter 22: Bean Validation: Advanced Topics 455 22.1 Creating Custom Constraints 455 22.2 Customizing Validator Messages 457 22.3 Grouping Constraints 457 22.4 Using Method Constraints in Type Hierarchies 458 Part V: Contexts and Dependency Injection for Java EE 461 Chapter 23: Introduction to Contexts and Dependency Injection for Java EE 463 23.1 Getting Started 464 23.2 Overview of CDI 466 23.3 About Beans 467 23.4 About CDI Managed Beans 468 23.5 Beans as Injectable Objects 468 23.6 Using Qualifiers 469 23.7 Injecting Beans 470 23.8 Using Scopes 471 23.9 Giving Beans EL Names 473 23.10 Adding Setter and Getter Methods 473 23.11 Using a Managed Bean in a Facelets Page 474 23.12 Injecting Objects by Using Producer Methods 474 23.13 Configuring a CDI Application 475 23.14 Using the @PostConstruct and @PreDestroy Annotations with CDI Managed Bean Classes 476 23.15 Further Information about CDI 477 Chapter 24: Running the Basic Contexts and Dependency Injection Examples 479 24.1 The simplegreeting CDI Example 479 24.2 The guessnumber-cdi CDI Example 483 Chapter 25: Contexts and Dependency Injection for Java EE: Advanced Topics 493 25.1 Packaging CDI Applications 493 25.2 Using Alternatives in CDI Applications 494 25.3 Using Producer Methods, Producer Fields, and Disposer Methods in CDI Applications 497 25.4 Using Predefined Beans in CDI Applications 499 25.5 Using Events in CDI Applications 501 25.6 Using Interceptors in CDI Applications 504 25.7 Using Decorators in CDI Applications 506 25.8 Using Stereotypes in CDI Applications 507 Chapter 26: Running the Advanced Contexts and Dependency Injection Examples 511 26.1 The encoder Example: Using Alternatives 511 26.2 The producermethods Example: Using a Producer Method to Choose a Bean Implementation 517 26.3 The producerfields Example: Using Producer Fields to Generate Resources 520 26.4 The billpayment Example: Using Events and Interceptors 527 26.5 The decorators Example: Decorating a Bean 535 Part VI: Web Services 539 Chapter 27: Introduction to Web Services 541 27.1 What Are Web Services? 541 27.2 Types of Web Services 541 27.3 Deciding Which Type of Web Service to Use 544 Chapter 28: Building Web Services with JAX-WS 545 28.1 Creating a Simple Web Service and Clients with JAX-WS 546 28.2 Types Supported by JAX-WS 555 28.3 Web Services Interoperability and JAX-WS 557 28.4 Further Information about JAX-WS 558 Chapter 29: Building RESTful Web Services with JAX-RS 559 29.1 What Are RESTful Web Services? 559 29.2 Creating a RESTful Root Resource Class 561 29.3 Example Applications for JAX-RS 578 29.4 Further Information about JAX-RS 583 Chapter 30: Accessing REST Resources with the JAX-RS Client API 585 30.1 Overview of the Client API 585 30.2 Using the Client API in the JAX-RS Example Applications 589 30.3 Advanced Features of the Client API 592 Chapter 31: JAX-RS: Advanced Topics and an Example 597 31.1 Annotations for Field and Bean Properties of Resource Classes 598 31.2 Validating Resource Data with Bean Validation 601 31.3 Subresources and Runtime Resource Resolution 604 31.4 Integrating JAX-RS with EJB Technology and CDI 606 31.5 Conditional HTTP Requests 608 31.6 Runtime Content Negotiation 609 31.7 Using JAX-RS with JAXB 611 31.8 The customer Example Application 618 Index 627

Product Details

  • ISBN13: 9780321994929
  • Format: Paperback
  • Number Of Pages: 696
  • ID: 9780321994929
  • weight: 1128
  • ISBN10: 0321994922
  • edition: 5th edition

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