The Language of Queen Elizabeth I: A Sociolinguistic Perspective on Royal Style and Identity (Publications of the Philological Society)

The Language of Queen Elizabeth I: A Sociolinguistic Perspective on Royal Style and Identity (Publications of the Philological Society)

By: Mel Evans (author)Paperback

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Description

The Language of Queen Elizabeth I presents one of the first diachronic accounts of the language the idiolect of the Tudor monarch who ruled England and Ireland from 1558-1603. * Suggests that Elizabeth I was a leader of language innovation and change, using it to build her complex social identity as a female monarch in a masculine position of power * Examines a number of the monarch s letters, speeches, and translations * Establishes Elizabeth I s participation in ten morpho-syntactic changes and explores her spelling practice * Develops theoretical and methodological frameworks of variationist sociolinguistics through the analysis of the individual speaker * Argues for the significance of style as a linguistic and material property in our account of language variation and change

About Author

Mel Evans is a Lecturer in English Language at the University of Birmingham. Her research explores the relationship between language variation and change, style, and identity in contemporary and Early Modern English, with a particular interest in the language of the Tudor Court.

Contents

Acknowledgements List of Abbreviations Part 1 1. Introduction 1 1.1 Historical Sociolinguistics 1.2 Research Question 1 1.3 Research Question 2 1.4 Research Question 3 2. The Elizabeth I Corpus (QEIC) 3. Methodology 3.1 Macro-level Corpora 3.2 Comparative Analysis 3.3 Social Factors 3.4 Interactive Factors 3.5 Stylistic Factors 3.6 Systemic Factors 3.7 Linguistic Factors Part 2: Results and Analysis 4. Affirmative Do 4.1 Results 4.2 Social Factors 4.3 Systemic Factors 4.4 Interactive Factors 4.5 Stylistic Factors 4.6 Summary 5. Negative Do 5.1 Results 5.2 Systemic Factors 5.3 Social Factors 5.4 Interactive Factors 5.5 Stylistic Factors 5.6 Summary 6. The Replacement of Ye by You 6.1 Results 6.2 Social Factors 6.3 Stylistic Factors 6.4 Interactive and Systemic Factors 6.5 Summary 7. First- and Second-Person Possessive Determiners 7.1 Results 7.2 Social Factors 7.3 Stylistic Factors 7.4 Interactive Factors 7.5 Summary 8. Multiple Negation vs. Single Negation 8.1 Results 8.2 Systemic Factors 8.3 Social Factors 8.4 Stylistic Factors 8.5 Summary 9. Animacy and Relative Marker: who/which 9.1 Results 9.2 Systemic Factors 9.3 Social Factors 9.4 Interactive Factors 9.5 Stylistic Factors 9.6 Objective case: whom/which 9.7 Summary 10. Which and The Which 10.1 Results 10.2 Social Factors 10.3 Systemic Factors 10.4 Stylistic Factors 10.5 Interactive Factors 10.6 Summary 11. Superlative Adjectives 11.1 Results 11.2 Systemic Factors 11.3 Interactive Factors 11.4 Stylistic Factors 11.5 Double Forms 11.6 Results 11.7 Stylistic Factors 11.8 Summary 12. Royal We and Other Pronouns of Self-Reference 12.1 Background 12.2 Results 12.3 Interactive Factors 12.4 Stylistic Factors 12.5 Comparison with Other Royal Idiolects 12.6 Other Pronouns of Self-Reference 12.7 Summary 13. Spelling 13.1 Background 13.2 Methodology 13.3 Results: Spelling Consistency 13.4 Diachronic Consistency 13.5 Graph Combinations 13.6 Final 13.7 and 13.8 Combinations 13.9 , and 13.10 and 13.11 and 13.12 and 13.13 Idiosyncrasies and Spelling Reform 13.14 Summary Part 3: Research Questions 14. Research Question 1 14.1 The Gender Question 14.2 Summary 15. Research Question 2 15.1 Case Study 1: The Seymour Letters 15.2 Case Study 2: 1576 Parliamentary Speech 15.3 Case Study 3: The CEEC Hoby Letter 15.4 Case Study 4: 1597 Prayer 15.5 Summary 16. Research Question 3 16.1 Idiolects and Idiosyncrasy 16.2 Adolescence and Adulthood 16.3 Linguistic Leadership 16.4 Innovators, Early Adopters and Networks 16.5 Explaining Progressiveness: Communities of Practice 16.6 Hypercorrection and Linguistic Leadership 16.7 Stylistic Variation and Historical Sociolinguistics 17. Final Word Part 4: Appendix 18. Tabular Data 19. The Queen Elizabeth I Corpus (QEIC) 19.1 Correspondence 19.2 Speeches 19.3 Translations 19.4 Queen Elizabeth I Corpus: Text Information Textual Sources References

Product Details

  • ISBN13: 9781118672877
  • Format: Paperback
  • Number Of Pages: 266
  • ID: 9781118672877
  • weight: 318
  • ISBN10: 1118672879

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